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N.C. firm frontrunner for train station work

A Winston-Salem, N.C. architectural firm with experience in refurbishing fire-damaged train stations is the frontrunner for the Pulaski Train Station rebuild.
The town has decided to negotiate a contract with the firm of David E. Gall to oversee the architectural requirements for the project.
According to a listing with the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce, the business is a full-service architectural firm that handles commercial, residential and historic preservation projects.
Councilman Larry Clevinger II, who was part of a committee that interviewed the dozen firms seeking the job, said the committee has narrowed the field down to three firms, with David E. Gall being the top choice.
The interviews were conducted Thursday, Feb. 12 and Tuesday, Feb. 17. Clevinger announced the committee’s decision at Pulaski Town Council’s work session Tuesday.
According to Clevinger, the Winston-Salem firm showed pictures of a North Carolina train depot it had “totally rehabbed.” He said the depot burned in the 1940s and sat vacant for years before being rehabilitated.
However, the town councilman added, “What set this group apart for me…was their historical commitment…”
He said the firm goes into great detail in its work.
“(Gall) was the only (bidding firm) that actually came and surveyed the building. He (Gall representative) had pictures of our building on the interior and he already had plans of action for repairs.”
Clevinger said the firm talked about having to clean all the stone on the inside and outside of the building, “which nobody (from the other bidding firms) had mentioned. If you don’t clean it up on the inside and you cover it up, it’s going to stink eventually.”
Clevinger said the North Carolina firm even oversaw the move of a 400-ton railroad station in Hamlet, N.C. “They picked it up, carried it across the railroad tracks, turned it around and set it back down.”
Another feature that set Gall apart from the other firms is the detail it uses to make a structure match the original building as much as possible.
Clevinger said the firm takes paint scrapings and has the historic layers chemically analyzed to determine the colors that were used as far back in time as possible.
Meetings have been scheduled with representatives of Gall and the town’s insurance company to negotiate a contract for the job.
If the negotiations are not successful “then we’ll drop down to the second one on the list,” Hawley said.
Hawley contacted Gall representatives shortly after meeting with them to inform them the town would like to “structure” a contract with them.
“I think they got the call before they even got home. They really sold themselves today.”
“They did,” Clevinger added. He said he isn’t so sure they even left town after the meeting because he saw them driving around town looking at architecture.
Another advantage with Gall is that “they are prepared to get started immediately,” he noted.
“They’re ready to step in and go immediately,” the councilman said. He noted Gall is “extremely enthusiastic” and, also, is a member of the National Railway Historical Society. “He knew about the burning (of the train station) before we ever even went out” to bid on the contract.
Hawley said he hopes to have the contract structured to everyone’s liking by town council’s March 2 meeting.

N.C. firm frontrunner for train station work

A Winston-Salem, N.C. architectural firm with experience in refurbishing fire-damaged train stations is the frontrunner for the Pulaski Train Station rebuild.
The town has decided to negotiate a contract with the firm of David E. Gall to oversee the architectural requirements for the project.
According to a listing with the Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce, the business is a full-service architectural firm that handles commercial, residential and historic preservation projects.
Councilman Larry Clevinger II, who was part of a committee that interviewed the dozen firms seeking the job, said the committee has narrowed the field down to three firms, with David E. Gall being the top choice.
The interviews were conducted Thursday, Feb. 12 and Tuesday, Feb. 17. Clevinger announced the committee’s decision at Pulaski Town Council’s work session Tuesday.
According to Clevinger, the Winston-Salem firm showed pictures of a North Carolina train depot it had “totally rehabbed.” He said the depot burned in the 1940s and sat vacant for years before being rehabilitated.
However, the town councilman added, “What set this group apart for me…was their historical commitment…”
He said the firm goes into great detail in its work.
“(Gall) was the only (bidding firm) that actually came and surveyed the building. He (Gall representative) had pictures of our building on the interior and he already had plans of action for repairs.”
Clevinger said the firm talked about having to clean all the stone on the inside and outside of the building, “which nobody (from the other bidding firms) had mentioned. If you don’t clean it up on the inside and you cover it up, it’s going to stink eventually.”
Clevinger said the North Carolina firm even oversaw the move of a 400-ton railroad station in Hamlet, N.C. “They picked it up, carried it across the railroad tracks, turned it around and set it back down.”
Another feature that set Gall apart from the other firms is the detail it uses to make a structure match the original building as much as possible.
Clevinger said the firm takes paint scrapings and has the historic layers chemically analyzed to determine the colors that were used as far back in time as possible.
Meetings have been scheduled with representatives of Gall and the town’s insurance company to negotiate a contract for the job.
If the negotiations are not successful “then we’ll drop down to the second one on the list,” Hawley said.
Hawley contacted Gall representatives shortly after meeting with them to inform them the town would like to “structure” a contract with them.
“I think they got the call before they even got home. They really sold themselves today.”
“They did,” Clevinger added. He said he isn’t so sure they even left town after the meeting because he saw them driving around town looking at architecture.
Another advantage with Gall is that “they are prepared to get started immediately,” he noted.
“They’re ready to step in and go immediately,” the councilman said. He noted Gall is “extremely enthusiastic” and, also, is a member of the National Railway Historical Society. “He knew about the burning (of the train station) before we ever even went out” to bid on the contract.
Hawley said he hopes to have the contract structured to everyone’s liking by town council’s March 2 meeting.