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Project funds sought

A project that would reduce chemical and personnel costs at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority may be completed sooner than planned if it can successfully compete with other state projects for economic stimulus funding.
Clarke Wallcraft, the authority’s executive director, said a Capital Improvements Plan approved by the Authority’s board of directors in November called for the Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection Conversion project to be funded over a period of two to three years.
However, the time frame could be moved up significantly thanks to an estimated $80-$120 million expected to be made available to the Virginia Revolving Loan Fund as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The Recovery Act is recently approved legislation commonly referred to as an economic stimulus package.
Conversion to UV disinfection rather than chlorine disinfection will not only eliminate some chemical costs, but will also reduce hazards associated with chemical use.
Plus, he noted, it will “bring the Authority closer to reducing personnel costs associated with the third-shift operations.”
Wallcraft said the Authority “could be in an advantageous position to obtain funding” for the conversion project because it could move forward quickly. Therefore, he suggested the Authority move up the time frame for completion of a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER) for the project.
According to President Barack Obama one goal of the Recovery Act is to fund projects that would put people to work quickly.
With an engineering report in the works, Wallcraft said he believes the UV project would have a better chance of being selected for funding. Since the PER will have to be completed at some point before the project can proceed, he said the report cost will not be a loss to the Authority if the project doesn’t receive stimulus funding.
“If we’re not successful, the PER will be ready and ‘on the shelf’ for future use,” the executive director told board members.
In order to speed up the PER, Wallcraft said he asked Olver Inc. of Blacksburg to provide a quote for completing the report. The cost will be $7,500.
Asked by a board member whether a request for proposal (RFP) should be advertised for the engineering report, Wallcraft said the limited cost of the project does not require an RFP be issued. He said he chose to go with Olver rather than seek bids in order to speed up the report process. Besides, he pointed out, Olver already has extensive knowledge of the treatment plant.
The board approved moving forward with the Olver bid.
If the UV project is approved, the Authority will be able to review the terms of the funding before entering into a contract. There would be no obligation to accept the funds.
Robert Asbury, a representative for Radford City, pointed out that the UV conversion has been planned for “a number of years.” He said it didn’t arise merely due to the fact some federal money might be available to fund it.
“I want to be clear that this is not an effort to engage in a wasteful expenditure of federal funds,” he said. “The timing (of the stimulus money) is convenient, but this is a necessary project. It didn’t just come to mind because of the money.”

Pulaski County Engineer Ron Coake asked that the Authority consider allowing Pulaski County Public Service Authority to join in the project as long as the PSA doesn’t impede the time frame to receive funding.

Project funds sought

A project that would reduce chemical and personnel costs at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority may be completed sooner than planned if it can successfully compete with other state projects for economic stimulus funding.
Clarke Wallcraft, the authority’s executive director, said a Capital Improvements Plan approved by the Authority’s board of directors in November called for the Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection Conversion project to be funded over a period of two to three years.
However, the time frame could be moved up significantly thanks to an estimated $80-$120 million expected to be made available to the Virginia Revolving Loan Fund as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The Recovery Act is recently approved legislation commonly referred to as an economic stimulus package.
Conversion to UV disinfection rather than chlorine disinfection will not only eliminate some chemical costs, but will also reduce hazards associated with chemical use.
Plus, he noted, it will “bring the Authority closer to reducing personnel costs associated with the third-shift operations.”
Wallcraft said the Authority “could be in an advantageous position to obtain funding” for the conversion project because it could move forward quickly. Therefore, he suggested the Authority move up the time frame for completion of a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER) for the project.
According to President Barack Obama one goal of the Recovery Act is to fund projects that would put people to work quickly.
With an engineering report in the works, Wallcraft said he believes the UV project would have a better chance of being selected for funding. Since the PER will have to be completed at some point before the project can proceed, he said the report cost will not be a loss to the Authority if the project doesn’t receive stimulus funding.
“If we’re not successful, the PER will be ready and ‘on the shelf’ for future use,” the executive director told board members.
In order to speed up the PER, Wallcraft said he asked Olver Inc. of Blacksburg to provide a quote for completing the report. The cost will be $7,500.
Asked by a board member whether a request for proposal (RFP) should be advertised for the engineering report, Wallcraft said the limited cost of the project does not require an RFP be issued. He said he chose to go with Olver rather than seek bids in order to speed up the report process. Besides, he pointed out, Olver already has extensive knowledge of the treatment plant.
The board approved moving forward with the Olver bid.
If the UV project is approved, the Authority will be able to review the terms of the funding before entering into a contract. There would be no obligation to accept the funds.
Robert Asbury, a representative for Radford City, pointed out that the UV conversion has been planned for “a number of years.” He said it didn’t arise merely due to the fact some federal money might be available to fund it.
“I want to be clear that this is not an effort to engage in a wasteful expenditure of federal funds,” he said. “The timing (of the stimulus money) is convenient, but this is a necessary project. It didn’t just come to mind because of the money.”

Pulaski County Engineer Ron Coake asked that the Authority consider allowing Pulaski County Public Service Authority to join in the project as long as the PSA doesn’t impede the time frame to receive funding.