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Tax rate hearing Feb. 23

Pulaski County residents will be able to find out soon what impact the recent real estate reassessment is likely to have on their wallets.
Pulaski County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing Feb. 23 on a proposed 50 cents per $100 real estate tax rate for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. Although the hearing will be held Feb. 23, the board will not vote on a set rate until its March 23 meeting.
The February meeting will be held in the auditorium at Pulaski Middle School to accommodate an anticipated large crowd. It begins at 7 p.m.
The county has advertised a 12-cent reduction of the current rate of 62 cents per $100 of assessed value in order to accommodate for widespread hikes in assessments. Some citizens complained their property values increased by as much as 400 percent under the new assessments.
Hundreds of county residents have packed the last three supervisors meetings, complaining that the new property values cannot possibly be accurate given the downturn in the housing market. They have called for the supervisors to throw out the reassessment and hire a new firm to do them over.
Although the advertised proposed rate is 50 cents per $100 of assessed value, the board of supervisors could vote to impose a lower rate if it so chooses.
According to County Administrator Peter Huber, the “equalized rate” under the new assessments will be around 46 to 48 cents per $100 of value. The equalized (lowered tax) rate is the rate that would bring in the same amount of revenue under the new assessed values as was collected under the old assessments.
However, the true amount of that rate will not be known until the Board of Equalization rules on all reassessment appeals filed by property owners. That board’s final hearings will be held March 7.
Huber had recommended the board advertise a 54-cent rate.
Only Robinson District Supervisor Charles Bopp voted against the 50-cent rate. He indicated he would like to see the rate be lower.

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Tax rate hearing Feb. 23

Pulaski County residents will be able to find out soon what impact the recent real estate reassessment is likely to have on their wallets.
Pulaski County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing Feb. 23 on a proposed 50 cents per $100 real estate tax rate for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. Although the hearing will be held Feb. 23, the board will not vote on a set rate until its March 23 meeting.
The February meeting will be held in the auditorium at Pulaski Middle School to accommodate an anticipated large crowd. It begins at 7 p.m.
The county has advertised a 12-cent reduction of the current rate of 62 cents per $100 of assessed value in order to accommodate for widespread hikes in assessments. Some citizens complained their property values increased by as much as 400 percent under the new assessments.
Hundreds of county residents have packed the last three supervisors meetings, complaining that the new property values cannot possibly be accurate given the downturn in the housing market. They have called for the supervisors to throw out the reassessment and hire a new firm to do them over.
Although the advertised proposed rate is 50 cents per $100 of assessed value, the board of supervisors could vote to impose a lower rate if it so chooses.
According to County Administrator Peter Huber, the “equalized rate” under the new assessments will be around 46 to 48 cents per $100 of value. The equalized (lowered tax) rate is the rate that would bring in the same amount of revenue under the new assessed values as was collected under the old assessments.
However, the true amount of that rate will not be known until the Board of Equalization rules on all reassessment appeals filed by property owners. That board’s final hearings will be held March 7.
Huber had recommended the board advertise a 54-cent rate.
Only Robinson District Supervisor Charles Bopp voted against the 50-cent rate. He indicated he would like to see the rate be lower.

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