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Septage station to be built

After several years of delays, Peppers Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority is finally getting a septage receiving station that will help protect its equipment and allow for more accurate billing of septic tank cleaning companies.
The authority has had the receiving station in its budget for several years, but it had to be put on hold due to revenue reductions – the most recent of which was caused by drought reducing flows of wastewater into the plant.
Now, the project is once again in the works and a $116,696 bid is being awarded to JWC Environmental of Santa Ana, Calif. The bid was one of two received, but one of the bids was deemed non-responsive because it did not include required supporting documentation.
Clarke Wallcraft, executive director of the Authority, said the receiving station is used to hold waste (septage) hauled to the plant from permitted septic tank cleaning companies.
Presently, the waste is downloaded into the system without any pre-treatment or screening. Wallcraft said and it sometimes contains items such as undigested toilet paper, rocks and even toys children have flushed down toilets. Such debris can damage the plant’s equipment by causing clogs and breaking pumps.
The septage receiving station allows a place for trucks hauling the waste to physically connection with the station so that debris is filtered from the waste and compacted. The compacted material is then placed in a liner, which is placed in the landfill.
According to Wallcraft, the Authority receives about $65,000 per year through its septage program, so the receiving station will “pay for itself” in two years. He stressed that member jurisdictions will not have to pay for it.
Besides filtering out harmful items from the septage, another advantage of receiving station is more accurate bills.
Wallcraft said the receiving station will include a metering device that will be able to determine the exact amount of septage pumped into the system. Companies are billed based on the amount of septage downloaded into the treatment plant.
Under the present system, billing is based on the rated capacity of the truck making the delivery. If the company is able to “squeeze in” more septage than the truck’s rating, it is not billed for the excess amount.

With the receiving station equipment, every bit of septage will be metered to insure accurate billing.
Wallcraft said he expects delivery of the receiving station in late June to early July.

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Septage station to be built

After several years of delays, Peppers Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority is finally getting a septage receiving station that will help protect its equipment and allow for more accurate billing of septic tank cleaning companies.
The authority has had the receiving station in its budget for several years, but it had to be put on hold due to revenue reductions – the most recent of which was caused by drought reducing flows of wastewater into the plant.
Now, the project is once again in the works and a $116,696 bid is being awarded to JWC Environmental of Santa Ana, Calif. The bid was one of two received, but one of the bids was deemed non-responsive because it did not include required supporting documentation.
Clarke Wallcraft, executive director of the Authority, said the receiving station is used to hold waste (septage) hauled to the plant from permitted septic tank cleaning companies.
Presently, the waste is downloaded into the system without any pre-treatment or screening. Wallcraft said and it sometimes contains items such as undigested toilet paper, rocks and even toys children have flushed down toilets. Such debris can damage the plant’s equipment by causing clogs and breaking pumps.
The septage receiving station allows a place for trucks hauling the waste to physically connection with the station so that debris is filtered from the waste and compacted. The compacted material is then placed in a liner, which is placed in the landfill.
According to Wallcraft, the Authority receives about $65,000 per year through its septage program, so the receiving station will “pay for itself” in two years. He stressed that member jurisdictions will not have to pay for it.
Besides filtering out harmful items from the septage, another advantage of receiving station is more accurate bills.
Wallcraft said the receiving station will include a metering device that will be able to determine the exact amount of septage pumped into the system. Companies are billed based on the amount of septage downloaded into the treatment plant.
Under the present system, billing is based on the rated capacity of the truck making the delivery. If the company is able to “squeeze in” more septage than the truck’s rating, it is not billed for the excess amount.

With the receiving station equipment, every bit of septage will be metered to insure accurate billing.
Wallcraft said he expects delivery of the receiving station in late June to early July.

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