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Van lot focus of council meeting

The owner of a Volkswagen van shop on Route 11 says it’s not necessary for the Town of Pulaski to legislate his cooperation with the town.
Kevin Lindamood of VuhVanagon said he didn’t organize his business to skirt town ordinances. He said he has been working with the town to make sure the business complies with all town ordinances and meets zoning requirements.
Lindamood’s business presently occupies four lots at the corner of Route 11 and Northwood Drive. The bulk of the business is on the north side of Northwood, but van storage has been expanded across the street to the former Pulaski Flower Shop property and two lots behind the flower shop. One of those lots is zoned residential (R-1), which prohibits the vans from being stored there.
Lindamood noted the former flower shop property was originally his birth home.
He told town council he is “committed” to the business, which sells the vans through a website, vuhvanagon.com.
“I understand one man’s treasure is another man’s trash,” he said. “I’m willing to work with the town.”
Over the past few months, citizens and some councilmen have expressed concern about the expanding number of vans at the business. That led to discussions about the town’s inoperable vehicle ordinance and a proposal to establish a fee of as much as $100 per inoperable vehicle.
Lindamood said he had been working with the town, but was unaware of the extent of concern about his business until reading, in The Southwest Times, a story about the proposed inoperable vehicle fee.
Mayor Jeff Worrell assured Lindamood that town council is not “targeting” his business. “The inoperable vehicle problem was with us long before you started your business.”
Councilman Morgan Welker, who has been most vocal about the business, said Lindamood met with him about his concerns.
“I think our understanding is that I’d like to see him get a DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) dealers license to legitimize the business and have him play by the same rules as everybody else,” Welker said. “I’d also like to see some improvements to the property like moving the vehicles back from the edge of the street and adding some landscaping. I think that would make everybody happy.”
Worrell noted that town council’s only authority is to insure “everyone in town complies with our ordinances.”
However, Lindamood said he recognizes “authority beyond the written word.”
Brian Geist, who operates a business nearby and passes by VuhVanagon numerous times daily, said he thinks Lindamood’s business is “a lot better than what we had there before.”
Worrell said he doesn’t see a need to pass any additional legislation regarding inoperable vehicles, noting that it is “an enforcement issue.” He said a review of ordinances in other jurisdictions revealed they were “about the same” as Pulaski’s.
Town Manager John Hawley said a closer evaluation of inoperable vehicle citations found that there were more than 1,000 processed between 2001 and 2009. However, as of Jan. 30, there were only 187 citations that were in “non-compliance.”
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said he, at one time, was in favor of a fee to keep an inoperable vehicle. But, in light of the fact it would have to be equally applied in all situations, he has changed his mind. He said he wouldn’t want someone to have to pay an annual fee for a “pet project” such as someone restoring a classic vehicle.
However, town council did agree with Welker that it would be “worthwhile” to clarify some “housekeeping” issues concerning wording in the existing ordinance.
For instance, the current ordinance limits the number of inoperable vehicles to one per person. Town Attorney David Warburton suggested that wording be amended to one per parcel since a number of people could live on a single lot.

Van lot focus of council meeting

The owner of a Volkswagen van shop on Route 11 says it’s not necessary for the Town of Pulaski to legislate his cooperation with the town.
Kevin Lindamood of VuhVanagon said he didn’t organize his business to skirt town ordinances. He said he has been working with the town to make sure the business complies with all town ordinances and meets zoning requirements.
Lindamood’s business presently occupies four lots at the corner of Route 11 and Northwood Drive. The bulk of the business is on the north side of Northwood, but van storage has been expanded across the street to the former Pulaski Flower Shop property and two lots behind the flower shop. One of those lots is zoned residential (R-1), which prohibits the vans from being stored there.
Lindamood noted the former flower shop property was originally his birth home.
He told town council he is “committed” to the business, which sells the vans through a website, vuhvanagon.com.
“I understand one man’s treasure is another man’s trash,” he said. “I’m willing to work with the town.”
Over the past few months, citizens and some councilmen have expressed concern about the expanding number of vans at the business. That led to discussions about the town’s inoperable vehicle ordinance and a proposal to establish a fee of as much as $100 per inoperable vehicle.
Lindamood said he had been working with the town, but was unaware of the extent of concern about his business until reading, in The Southwest Times, a story about the proposed inoperable vehicle fee.
Mayor Jeff Worrell assured Lindamood that town council is not “targeting” his business. “The inoperable vehicle problem was with us long before you started your business.”
Councilman Morgan Welker, who has been most vocal about the business, said Lindamood met with him about his concerns.
“I think our understanding is that I’d like to see him get a DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) dealers license to legitimize the business and have him play by the same rules as everybody else,” Welker said. “I’d also like to see some improvements to the property like moving the vehicles back from the edge of the street and adding some landscaping. I think that would make everybody happy.”
Worrell noted that town council’s only authority is to insure “everyone in town complies with our ordinances.”
However, Lindamood said he recognizes “authority beyond the written word.”
Brian Geist, who operates a business nearby and passes by VuhVanagon numerous times daily, said he thinks Lindamood’s business is “a lot better than what we had there before.”
Worrell said he doesn’t see a need to pass any additional legislation regarding inoperable vehicles, noting that it is “an enforcement issue.” He said a review of ordinances in other jurisdictions revealed they were “about the same” as Pulaski’s.
Town Manager John Hawley said a closer evaluation of inoperable vehicle citations found that there were more than 1,000 processed between 2001 and 2009. However, as of Jan. 30, there were only 187 citations that were in “non-compliance.”
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said he, at one time, was in favor of a fee to keep an inoperable vehicle. But, in light of the fact it would have to be equally applied in all situations, he has changed his mind. He said he wouldn’t want someone to have to pay an annual fee for a “pet project” such as someone restoring a classic vehicle.
However, town council did agree with Welker that it would be “worthwhile” to clarify some “housekeeping” issues concerning wording in the existing ordinance.
For instance, the current ordinance limits the number of inoperable vehicles to one per person. Town Attorney David Warburton suggested that wording be amended to one per parcel since a number of people could live on a single lot.