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Some blood types in short supply 

ROANOKE — Low blood donations over the holidays have created a potentially serious shortage of type O negative blood supplies in our area.
“Unless O negative donations improve dramatically over the next few days the Red Cross may have serious difficulty in meeting hospital patient needs for that blood type,” according to Dave Smith, Director of Donor Recruitment for the Appalachian Blood Services Region.
Only about 7 percent of the population is type O negative.
“Being the universal blood type, which means patients with any blood type can receive O negative blood, it is important to maintain a strong inventory for hospital use with trauma patients where there isn’t time to test the blood type the accident victim prior to administering a blood transfusion. Currently, one serious accident could use all locally available O negative units,” added Smith.
The Red Cross is increasing efforts to contact donors of all types, especially those with type O negative blood, with an urgent request to donate in the coming days.
Eligible donors are urged to by calling 1 800 GIVE LIFE or visit www.arcgiveblood.org and make an appointment to donate at the next drive in the area. The next such blood drive is set for next Monday at the Dublin Lions Club from noon to 6 p.m.
Donors must be 16 (with parent permission) 17 without, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in general good health. It must be 56 days since a previous donation. Donors should bring their Red Cross donor card or a form of ID.

Because of the increased need for O positive and O negative, walk-ins are  needed to support our regular donors. Donors do not need to know their blood type in order to donate.

 

Some blood types in short supply 

ROANOKE — Low blood donations over the holidays have created a potentially serious shortage of type O negative blood supplies in our area.
“Unless O negative donations improve dramatically over the next few days the Red Cross may have serious difficulty in meeting hospital patient needs for that blood type,” according to Dave Smith, Director of Donor Recruitment for the Appalachian Blood Services Region.
Only about 7 percent of the population is type O negative.
“Being the universal blood type, which means patients with any blood type can receive O negative blood, it is important to maintain a strong inventory for hospital use with trauma patients where there isn’t time to test the blood type the accident victim prior to administering a blood transfusion. Currently, one serious accident could use all locally available O negative units,” added Smith.
The Red Cross is increasing efforts to contact donors of all types, especially those with type O negative blood, with an urgent request to donate in the coming days.
Eligible donors are urged to by calling 1 800 GIVE LIFE or visit www.arcgiveblood.org and make an appointment to donate at the next drive in the area. The next such blood drive is set for next Monday at the Dublin Lions Club from noon to 6 p.m.
Donors must be 16 (with parent permission) 17 without, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in general good health. It must be 56 days since a previous donation. Donors should bring their Red Cross donor card or a form of ID.

Because of the increased need for O positive and O negative, walk-ins are  needed to support our regular donors. Donors do not need to know their blood type in order to donate.