Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

McCready quits zoning post for BOE

After serving for more than a decade on Pulaski County’s Board of Zoning Appeals, area businessman Andy McCready has resigned from the board to serve on the newly appointed Board of Equalization.
McCready’s resignation became effective at midnight Tuesday. He said he regrets having to leave the BZA, which he chaired for all but six months of his 15 years on the board.
However, McCready said he is looking forward to assisting the county with the reassessment.
The Board of Equalization will hear residents’ appeals of their property assessments and decide whether the assessments are valid under state code or need adjustment.
McCready had to resign from the BZA in order to serve on the Equalization board because state code prohibits BZA members from serving on any other board while serving on the BZA.
He acknowledged the Equalization job will not be easy, but McCready said he feels the job the board will perform is important to the county and its citizens. He said he believes the citizens chosen to serve on the Equalization board are “good folks” who have the needs of individuals and the county “at heart.”
McCready noted that he feels “badly” for the county because it has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on a reassessment, only to have citizens “in an uproar” over the resulting values placed on their properties.
Hearings before the Board of Equalization begin Feb. 2 and the board has until mid-March to complete all hearings and render its decisions. Citizens must make appointments to appear before the board.
He said he expects the board to hear at least 200 cases, but there could be as many as 500 or 600. The hearings will be held at a rate of three per hour.
“We have 70 hours set aside right off the bat,” he added. However, additional time can be scheduled if necessary. While most hearings will be held during the daytime hours on weekdays, some Thursday night and Saturday hearings are being made available for those who have conflicts.
As for his time on BZA, McCready said it has been a pleasure and honor to serve on the zoning board over the years. He has served as chairman of the board several times.
He recalled one of the more unusual cases that came before the BZA during his early years of service. He said an attorney, whom he declined to identify, was “adamant” the BZA was going to rule in favor of his client on a particular case.
“(The attorney) said if we didn’t decide (the case) in his way he was going to sue us,” McCready said of the attorney who practiced in the New River Valley at that time. “I told him to shut up and sit down.
“I was chairing the board at that time. The funny thing is (the attorney) is a judge now, but not in our county.”
Asked whether he will return to the BZA after the Board of Equalization is disbanded, McCready said that would be up to the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors. He said some of the alternate members may be interested in becoming a full-time member.
But he didn’t rule out serving on some other county board if the county sees fit.
“I’ll serve whenever or wherever they want me to,” he added.
With McCready’s resignation, the BZA is now chaired by Tony Nicolo, who was vice chairman. The new vice chairman is Don Shelor.

Comments

comments

McCready quits zoning post for BOE

After serving for more than a decade on Pulaski County’s Board of Zoning Appeals, area businessman Andy McCready has resigned from the board to serve on the newly appointed Board of Equalization.
McCready’s resignation became effective at midnight Tuesday. He said he regrets having to leave the BZA, which he chaired for all but six months of his 15 years on the board.
However, McCready said he is looking forward to assisting the county with the reassessment.
The Board of Equalization will hear residents’ appeals of their property assessments and decide whether the assessments are valid under state code or need adjustment.
McCready had to resign from the BZA in order to serve on the Equalization board because state code prohibits BZA members from serving on any other board while serving on the BZA.
He acknowledged the Equalization job will not be easy, but McCready said he feels the job the board will perform is important to the county and its citizens. He said he believes the citizens chosen to serve on the Equalization board are “good folks” who have the needs of individuals and the county “at heart.”
McCready noted that he feels “badly” for the county because it has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on a reassessment, only to have citizens “in an uproar” over the resulting values placed on their properties.
Hearings before the Board of Equalization begin Feb. 2 and the board has until mid-March to complete all hearings and render its decisions. Citizens must make appointments to appear before the board.
He said he expects the board to hear at least 200 cases, but there could be as many as 500 or 600. The hearings will be held at a rate of three per hour.
“We have 70 hours set aside right off the bat,” he added. However, additional time can be scheduled if necessary. While most hearings will be held during the daytime hours on weekdays, some Thursday night and Saturday hearings are being made available for those who have conflicts.
As for his time on BZA, McCready said it has been a pleasure and honor to serve on the zoning board over the years. He has served as chairman of the board several times.
He recalled one of the more unusual cases that came before the BZA during his early years of service. He said an attorney, whom he declined to identify, was “adamant” the BZA was going to rule in favor of his client on a particular case.
“(The attorney) said if we didn’t decide (the case) in his way he was going to sue us,” McCready said of the attorney who practiced in the New River Valley at that time. “I told him to shut up and sit down.
“I was chairing the board at that time. The funny thing is (the attorney) is a judge now, but not in our county.”
Asked whether he will return to the BZA after the Board of Equalization is disbanded, McCready said that would be up to the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors. He said some of the alternate members may be interested in becoming a full-time member.
But he didn’t rule out serving on some other county board if the county sees fit.
“I’ll serve whenever or wherever they want me to,” he added.
With McCready’s resignation, the BZA is now chaired by Tony Nicolo, who was vice chairman. The new vice chairman is Don Shelor.

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login