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24 architects inquire about station work

The Town of Pulaski doesn’t have to worry about a lack of interest when it comes to finding an architectural firm to oversee design and restoration of the train station.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley said the town has received requests from about two dozen firms for Request for Quote (RFQ) packets containing contract documents and specifications for the job. Deadline for obtaining the documents and submitting a Statement of Qualifications to perform the work is Jan. 30.
Although about 24 firms have responded to the RFQ, Hawley said that doesn’t mean they all will decide to submit a quote. He estimated 10 to 15 proposals will be submitted for consideration.
According to town staff, the inquiries have come from businesses all over the country.
The historic train station, which was constructed in the late 1880’s, was heavily damaged by an early-morning fire Nov. 17. According to the RFQ advertisement, the fire “damaged most of the roof and interior wood finishes.” There also is water damage from the firefighting efforts.
Early last month, the town hired a firm to stabilize the structure and demolish any parts of the building that could not be salvaged.
Hawley said the goal is to have the rebuilt structure ready for re-dedication June 11, 2010 — the anniversary of the original dedication of the train station.
“Everyone says that’s a doable date,” he added.
Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell told members of Pulaski Town Council last night they will soon need to start discussing a use for the train station so the interior can be constructed to meet its use.
Prior to the fire, the train station housed the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Memorial Museum. However, the town already had voted to build a separate museum prior to the fire.
Under term of the train station’s insurance policy, the exterior of the station will have to be rebuilt to match the original structure. The interior, however, can be altered.

24 architects inquire about station work

The Town of Pulaski doesn’t have to worry about a lack of interest when it comes to finding an architectural firm to oversee design and restoration of the train station.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley said the town has received requests from about two dozen firms for Request for Quote (RFQ) packets containing contract documents and specifications for the job. Deadline for obtaining the documents and submitting a Statement of Qualifications to perform the work is Jan. 30.
Although about 24 firms have responded to the RFQ, Hawley said that doesn’t mean they all will decide to submit a quote. He estimated 10 to 15 proposals will be submitted for consideration.
According to town staff, the inquiries have come from businesses all over the country.
The historic train station, which was constructed in the late 1880’s, was heavily damaged by an early-morning fire Nov. 17. According to the RFQ advertisement, the fire “damaged most of the roof and interior wood finishes.” There also is water damage from the firefighting efforts.
Early last month, the town hired a firm to stabilize the structure and demolish any parts of the building that could not be salvaged.
Hawley said the goal is to have the rebuilt structure ready for re-dedication June 11, 2010 — the anniversary of the original dedication of the train station.
“Everyone says that’s a doable date,” he added.
Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell told members of Pulaski Town Council last night they will soon need to start discussing a use for the train station so the interior can be constructed to meet its use.
Prior to the fire, the train station housed the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Memorial Museum. However, the town already had voted to build a separate museum prior to the fire.
Under term of the train station’s insurance policy, the exterior of the station will have to be rebuilt to match the original structure. The interior, however, can be altered.