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County’s early industries

One stream, two industries and scores of rugged individuals were to a large extent responsible for the development of Pulaski County. The stream is the New River that along with its tributaries flow through,  and around the county for many miles. The streams running into the river are many, including Peak Creek, Little River, Clapboard Branch, Back Creek, Little River, Big Reed Island Creek, Little Reed Island Creek, Max Creek, Little Walker’s Creek, and  Neck Creek The industries that helped to make us a county were railroading, the iron industry, coal , and zinc mining.
One stream, two industries and scores of rugged individuals were to a large extent responsible for the development of Pulaski County. The stream is the New River that along with its tributaries flow through,  and around the county for many miles. The streams running into the river are many, including Peak Creek, Little River, Clapboard Branch, Back Creek, Little River, Big Reed Island Creek, Little Reed Island Creek, Max Creek, Little Walker’s Creek, and  Neck                    Creek The industries that helped to make us a county were railroading, the iron industry, coal , and zinc mining.
Back when President Andrew Jackson was president of the country, he traveled through the county on his trips back and forth from Tennessee to Washington,  and it is a part of history that he always liked to stop at the Galbreath   Red Horse Tavern in the Draper area for good New River catfish. Parts of that tavern still stand today, and contain the bed on which Jackson slept.
Before entering into the New River, Little River passes through the historic old village of   Snowville . A man by the name of Aisel Snow first noticed the area that became Allisonia   as he was passing through the area to deliver a load of furniture to an area resident. When he saw it, he made up his mind that on the site he would build  village. Snow bought the land, built the village, and established several industries that made the Village one of the major industrial towns in Southwest Virginia. Had  Snowville been fortunate enough to lure the railroad  into the village, it would have probably have surpassed Pulaski as an industrial area..
In his history of Snowville , W. R. Hundley recalls use of the New River that  we seldom read about. During the iron boom, a  channel was cut down through the middle of the river , from near Allisonia all the way to the point where Little River joins New River near Radford.  The purpose of the channel was to hail iron from the furnaces in the Allisonia area. It was hauled on long, narrow boats called bateaux. These boats, which were about  60 feet long and six feet wide were manufactured in an area located between Allisonia and Graysontown. The story is told that when one of these bateaux was launched, children would get on them and enjoy a thrilling ride into Little River. on the greased launchways.
It has been told that the channel down the middle of the river caused Appalachian Power Company no little troubles when the Claytor Dam was constructed, because when the Channel was dug, the river became a navigable stream, and that designation had never been taken from it
The river that runs through Pulaski County, just like about everything else about the county has an interesting history. 
Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

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County’s early industries

One stream, two industries and scores of rugged individuals were to a large extent responsible for the development of Pulaski County. The stream is the New River that along with its tributaries flow through,  and around the county for many miles. The streams running into the river are many, including Peak Creek, Little River, Clapboard Branch, Back Creek, Little River, Big Reed Island Creek, Little Reed Island Creek, Max Creek, Little Walker’s Creek, and  Neck Creek The industries that helped to make us a county were railroading, the iron industry, coal , and zinc mining.
One stream, two industries and scores of rugged individuals were to a large extent responsible for the development of Pulaski County. The stream is the New River that along with its tributaries flow through,  and around the county for many miles. The streams running into the river are many, including Peak Creek, Little River, Clapboard Branch, Back Creek, Little River, Big Reed Island Creek, Little Reed Island Creek, Max Creek, Little Walker’s Creek, and  Neck                    Creek The industries that helped to make us a county were railroading, the iron industry, coal , and zinc mining.
Back when President Andrew Jackson was president of the country, he traveled through the county on his trips back and forth from Tennessee to Washington,  and it is a part of history that he always liked to stop at the Galbreath   Red Horse Tavern in the Draper area for good New River catfish. Parts of that tavern still stand today, and contain the bed on which Jackson slept.
Before entering into the New River, Little River passes through the historic old village of   Snowville . A man by the name of Aisel Snow first noticed the area that became Allisonia   as he was passing through the area to deliver a load of furniture to an area resident. When he saw it, he made up his mind that on the site he would build  village. Snow bought the land, built the village, and established several industries that made the Village one of the major industrial towns in Southwest Virginia. Had  Snowville been fortunate enough to lure the railroad  into the village, it would have probably have surpassed Pulaski as an industrial area..
In his history of Snowville , W. R. Hundley recalls use of the New River that  we seldom read about. During the iron boom, a  channel was cut down through the middle of the river , from near Allisonia all the way to the point where Little River joins New River near Radford.  The purpose of the channel was to hail iron from the furnaces in the Allisonia area. It was hauled on long, narrow boats called bateaux. These boats, which were about  60 feet long and six feet wide were manufactured in an area located between Allisonia and Graysontown. The story is told that when one of these bateaux was launched, children would get on them and enjoy a thrilling ride into Little River. on the greased launchways.
It has been told that the channel down the middle of the river caused Appalachian Power Company no little troubles when the Claytor Dam was constructed, because when the Channel was dug, the river became a navigable stream, and that designation had never been taken from it
The river that runs through Pulaski County, just like about everything else about the county has an interesting history. 
Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

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