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Water rises at town’s reservoir

The Town of Pulaski didn’t have to do a rain dance to raise the water level at Gatewood Reservoir, it just had to propose a new drought policy.
“It’s been raining ever since we started discussing this,” Mayor Jeff Worrell said of the proposed policy at town council’s Tuesday night meeting.
“I suggest we put it on the agenda every month and threaten to pass it,” he joked, suggesting as long as the council is contemplating the policy the rain might continue.
Council members decided to have town staff develop a draft drought policy this past summer after the reservoir continued to drop to dangerously low levels. Gatewood serves as the town’s water supply.
However, Tuesday night Town Manager John Hawley said the reservoir is currently rising at a rate of 2.5 feet per week.
In October, Hawley said the reservoir was at the lowest level it had been since the late 1990s when it was down almost 25 feet. On Oct. 15, the reservoir was 17.86 feet below full pond (58 feet), according to a chart of reservoir levels recorded between 1997 and 2008.
At that time, Hawley suggested the town might need to impose a drought emergency if rainfall didn’t increase.
Since that time, the council has reviewed the situation at Gatewood monthly to determine whether to adopt the ordinance.
Each time, council members decided to hold off taking any action because there would be time to call an emergency meeting if the drought situation worsened to a point where water use restrictions were required.
According to Hawley, Gatewood and it’s back-up, Hogan’s Reservoir, are spring-fed and continued to be fed despite the drought.
If the policy is adopted, mandatory conservation measures that are proposed included prohibitions on using town water to:
• Wash down streets, sidewalks, walkways, driveways, parking lots, service station aprons, tennis courts and other hard surfaced areas, buildings, and structures, except as required for safety concerns;
• Wash automobiles, trucks, trailers and any other type of mobile equipment except in facilities operating with an alternate water source or with an approved water recycling system;
• Water shrubbery, trees, lawns, grass, plants and other vegetation, except when using an alternate water source;
• Operate any ornamental fountain or for scenic or recreational ponds or lakes; and
• Fill or refill swimming pools.
Worrell said there isn’t much use imposing the policy at this point since it applies to water uses that are generally summer activities.
Hawley said the town is continuing to monitor the water levels on a daily basis.

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Water rises at town’s reservoir

The Town of Pulaski didn’t have to do a rain dance to raise the water level at Gatewood Reservoir, it just had to propose a new drought policy.
“It’s been raining ever since we started discussing this,” Mayor Jeff Worrell said of the proposed policy at town council’s Tuesday night meeting.
“I suggest we put it on the agenda every month and threaten to pass it,” he joked, suggesting as long as the council is contemplating the policy the rain might continue.
Council members decided to have town staff develop a draft drought policy this past summer after the reservoir continued to drop to dangerously low levels. Gatewood serves as the town’s water supply.
However, Tuesday night Town Manager John Hawley said the reservoir is currently rising at a rate of 2.5 feet per week.
In October, Hawley said the reservoir was at the lowest level it had been since the late 1990s when it was down almost 25 feet. On Oct. 15, the reservoir was 17.86 feet below full pond (58 feet), according to a chart of reservoir levels recorded between 1997 and 2008.
At that time, Hawley suggested the town might need to impose a drought emergency if rainfall didn’t increase.
Since that time, the council has reviewed the situation at Gatewood monthly to determine whether to adopt the ordinance.
Each time, council members decided to hold off taking any action because there would be time to call an emergency meeting if the drought situation worsened to a point where water use restrictions were required.
According to Hawley, Gatewood and it’s back-up, Hogan’s Reservoir, are spring-fed and continued to be fed despite the drought.
If the policy is adopted, mandatory conservation measures that are proposed included prohibitions on using town water to:
• Wash down streets, sidewalks, walkways, driveways, parking lots, service station aprons, tennis courts and other hard surfaced areas, buildings, and structures, except as required for safety concerns;
• Wash automobiles, trucks, trailers and any other type of mobile equipment except in facilities operating with an alternate water source or with an approved water recycling system;
• Water shrubbery, trees, lawns, grass, plants and other vegetation, except when using an alternate water source;
• Operate any ornamental fountain or for scenic or recreational ponds or lakes; and
• Fill or refill swimming pools.
Worrell said there isn’t much use imposing the policy at this point since it applies to water uses that are generally summer activities.
Hawley said the town is continuing to monitor the water levels on a daily basis.

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