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Time changes everything

I came to Pulaski in 1941 when the United States was a boom town in high gear because of preparation for World War II.
The county was a defense area, and two giant ammunition plants were going full blast, manufacturing explosives that were being used in the war in Europe, and, late in the year, for the war against Japan.
The many skilled workers were turning out war supplies with such speed that there were times when production quotas had to be reduced in order to not over-produce.
It seemed like everything was geared toward the war effort.
Not only were the powder manufacturing plants turning out supplies of war, but the local industries in the town of Pulaski were also.
My, how things have changed.
The present office of The Southwest Times sits where there was once a swamp that was later filled to make a lot for the A&P Store.
The building across the street from the Pulaski Post Office was the Pulaski Café, a restaurant that stayed open 24 hours a day, providing food for the many defense workers.
On the southwest corner of Washington Avenue and Third Street, NE, was the Stevens Funeral Home, and the Town Office was in a building just north of the Pulaski Café, where the police department, the treasurer’s office, town court, mayor’s office, town council chambers and billing department were located.
There was so little room in the police station that if a prisoner had to be strip-searched, the lawbreaker had to be taken to the area where the town council met for the procedure to take place.
One time, a female was arrested and taken in to be searched.
The lady switchboard operator was assigned the task of searching the prisoner.
They went into the council chambers, and, soon, the switchboard operator reported to the chief, explaining that the prisoner had asked her to step out into the hall, telling her that she was too bashful to remove her clothes before anyone.
The next they heard from the prisoner she was enjoying a vacation in the adjoining state of Maryland.
The downtown block of Main Street between Franklin Avenue and Walnut in 1941 was taken up by houses for area workmen.
That long block now houses Adelphia, Sonic and other businesses.
Farther along eastward, was General Chemical Co., which is no longer in existence, being replaced by small businesses and large shopping center.
General Chemical once owned all of the land lying on each side of East Main Street and the Norfolk and Western Railroad crossing.
Today, there stands on this property Pizza Hut, McDonald’s, an auto parts shop, and two adjoining shopping centers.It’s hard to believe that in the 1940s Pulaski had two hotels.
The Pulaski Hotel at the southwest corner of Washington and Main, and the famous old Maple Shade Inn.
Motels had not become popular at that time, but tourist homes were. These homes were open to travelers, and compared with today’s bed-and-breakfast homes.
There were a few motels scattered throughout the county, some made up of small unattached cabins and possibly a restaurant.
If a local person’s automobile was seen parked at one of these establishments after dark, there was sometimes room for gossip.
Roads were narrow in the 1940s, with pavement just wide enough to fit between the wheels of an automobile.
Train and bus stations were busy places. Many of these transported a large number of service personnel. War supplies were hauled in railroad boxcars, and most trucks attached to military units.
Pulaski had two theaters, and Dublin had one, providing good movies and plenty of courting space for lovers.
Yes, Pulaski has really changed through the years.
Lloyd Mathews is retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

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Time changes everything

I came to Pulaski in 1941 when the United States was a boom town in high gear because of preparation for World War II.
The county was a defense area, and two giant ammunition plants were going full blast, manufacturing explosives that were being used in the war in Europe, and, late in the year, for the war against Japan.
The many skilled workers were turning out war supplies with such speed that there were times when production quotas had to be reduced in order to not over-produce.
It seemed like everything was geared toward the war effort.
Not only were the powder manufacturing plants turning out supplies of war, but the local industries in the town of Pulaski were also.
My, how things have changed.
The present office of The Southwest Times sits where there was once a swamp that was later filled to make a lot for the A&P Store.
The building across the street from the Pulaski Post Office was the Pulaski Café, a restaurant that stayed open 24 hours a day, providing food for the many defense workers.
On the southwest corner of Washington Avenue and Third Street, NE, was the Stevens Funeral Home, and the Town Office was in a building just north of the Pulaski Café, where the police department, the treasurer’s office, town court, mayor’s office, town council chambers and billing department were located.
There was so little room in the police station that if a prisoner had to be strip-searched, the lawbreaker had to be taken to the area where the town council met for the procedure to take place.
One time, a female was arrested and taken in to be searched.
The lady switchboard operator was assigned the task of searching the prisoner.
They went into the council chambers, and, soon, the switchboard operator reported to the chief, explaining that the prisoner had asked her to step out into the hall, telling her that she was too bashful to remove her clothes before anyone.
The next they heard from the prisoner she was enjoying a vacation in the adjoining state of Maryland.
The downtown block of Main Street between Franklin Avenue and Walnut in 1941 was taken up by houses for area workmen.
That long block now houses Adelphia, Sonic and other businesses.
Farther along eastward, was General Chemical Co., which is no longer in existence, being replaced by small businesses and large shopping center.
General Chemical once owned all of the land lying on each side of East Main Street and the Norfolk and Western Railroad crossing.
Today, there stands on this property Pizza Hut, McDonald’s, an auto parts shop, and two adjoining shopping centers.It’s hard to believe that in the 1940s Pulaski had two hotels.
The Pulaski Hotel at the southwest corner of Washington and Main, and the famous old Maple Shade Inn.
Motels had not become popular at that time, but tourist homes were. These homes were open to travelers, and compared with today’s bed-and-breakfast homes.
There were a few motels scattered throughout the county, some made up of small unattached cabins and possibly a restaurant.
If a local person’s automobile was seen parked at one of these establishments after dark, there was sometimes room for gossip.
Roads were narrow in the 1940s, with pavement just wide enough to fit between the wheels of an automobile.
Train and bus stations were busy places. Many of these transported a large number of service personnel. War supplies were hauled in railroad boxcars, and most trucks attached to military units.
Pulaski had two theaters, and Dublin had one, providing good movies and plenty of courting space for lovers.
Yes, Pulaski has really changed through the years.
Lloyd Mathews is retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

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