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State may cut more road funds

With cuts that have already been made in state transportation funding, Pulaski County officials say it will take 50 years to complete secondary road projects already on the county’s Six-Year Improvement Plan.
Now, the state is proposing to cut another $1.2 million from local secondary road funds, in addition to $23 million in funds for interstate, primary and urban roads.
The cuts are the latest in $1.3 billion in projects the Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB) removed from the Commonwealth’s draft Fiscal Year 2009-2014 Six Year Improvement Program (SYIP) at its monthly meeting Dec. 18 in Richmond.
The mid-year revision is part of the CTBs effort to address $2.6 billion in state and federal transportation revenue shortfalls over the next six years. According to the CTB, another $400 million in reductions are likely to follow.
The CTB will hold one of several statewide public hearings on the proposed cuts Monday night at 6 p.m. at New River Community College.
Among the most recent projects cut from the SYIP is replacement of the bridges on Interstate 81 that span the New River between Pulaski and Montgomery counties. The CTB proposes to remove nearly $42 million in funds from the SYIP by cutting that program.
The cut would remove $20,930,460 from each county’s interstate development program.
In earlier proposed cuts effecting I-81, the CTB removed funds from Pulaski County’s program that would have made improvements to Exit 94, south of Pulaski. Both the Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County have approved resolutions asking the CTB to restore those funds for safety reasons.
The most recent programs proposed to be cut from the SYIP would eliminate another project widely supported by both the Town of Pulaski and the county.
The CTB proposes to eliminate $659,124 set aside for “major widening” of East Main Street (Route 99). The funds were to be used for project engineering, right of ways and partial construction, according to the CTB proposal.
The revised SYIP also calls for elimination of a yet un-funded nearly $1.7 million primary road project in Pulaski County that would have been used for “Rt. 100 – bridge over Cleboune Boulevard.” The plan does not state whether it would have been repairs or replacement of the bridge, which is merely identified as structure #1041. The project was slated for Fiscal Year 2012-2014.
Secondary road projects that would be cut from the program would include $836,114 for reconstruction of Route 693 (earlier identified as Lead Mine, Julia Simpkins and Farris Mine roads); $351,054 for reconstruction and surface treating of Route 764 (Rock Creek Road); and $50,000 for the general overlaying of existing plant mix to various roads.
According to the CTB report, reductions to administrative programs and other services will account for more than $1 billion in cost cutting measures.
The CTB will finalize the revised program in January.
“We are holding this unusual mid-year revision of the six-year program because of the significant changes to the official transportation revenue estimate,” said Secretary of Transportation Pierce Homer.
“This revised plan cuts $1.3 billion from our six-year program in addition to the $1.1 billion we had to remove from this plan when we ratified it in June. As transportation revenues continue to shrink, we must develop a fiscally responsible program to govern transportation investment in the commonwealth.”
In the draft plan released to the CTB in December, the $10.6 billion program adopted in June was reduced to $9.3 billion with cuts to all highway systems including:
• $614.9 million in interstate funds;
• $240 million in primary road funds;
• $198.6 million in secondary road funds; and
• $89.5 million in urban road funds
“As we developed these revisions to the program,” Homer said, “we focused on maximizing federal funding, continuing project phases that are already under way, and developing needed projects for safety, bridges and reconstructing existing infrastructure. However, there are simply more needs than we have funding available.”
The revised program, lists of individual project impacts by VDOT district, and copies of the presentations given to the CTB are posted at www.VirginiaDOT.org.

State may cut more road funds

With cuts that have already been made in state transportation funding, Pulaski County officials say it will take 50 years to complete secondary road projects already on the county’s Six-Year Improvement Plan.
Now, the state is proposing to cut another $1.2 million from local secondary road funds, in addition to $23 million in funds for interstate, primary and urban roads.
The cuts are the latest in $1.3 billion in projects the Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB) removed from the Commonwealth’s draft Fiscal Year 2009-2014 Six Year Improvement Program (SYIP) at its monthly meeting Dec. 18 in Richmond.
The mid-year revision is part of the CTBs effort to address $2.6 billion in state and federal transportation revenue shortfalls over the next six years. According to the CTB, another $400 million in reductions are likely to follow.
The CTB will hold one of several statewide public hearings on the proposed cuts Monday night at 6 p.m. at New River Community College.
Among the most recent projects cut from the SYIP is replacement of the bridges on Interstate 81 that span the New River between Pulaski and Montgomery counties. The CTB proposes to remove nearly $42 million in funds from the SYIP by cutting that program.
The cut would remove $20,930,460 from each county’s interstate development program.
In earlier proposed cuts effecting I-81, the CTB removed funds from Pulaski County’s program that would have made improvements to Exit 94, south of Pulaski. Both the Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County have approved resolutions asking the CTB to restore those funds for safety reasons.
The most recent programs proposed to be cut from the SYIP would eliminate another project widely supported by both the Town of Pulaski and the county.
The CTB proposes to eliminate $659,124 set aside for “major widening” of East Main Street (Route 99). The funds were to be used for project engineering, right of ways and partial construction, according to the CTB proposal.
The revised SYIP also calls for elimination of a yet un-funded nearly $1.7 million primary road project in Pulaski County that would have been used for “Rt. 100 – bridge over Cleboune Boulevard.” The plan does not state whether it would have been repairs or replacement of the bridge, which is merely identified as structure #1041. The project was slated for Fiscal Year 2012-2014.
Secondary road projects that would be cut from the program would include $836,114 for reconstruction of Route 693 (earlier identified as Lead Mine, Julia Simpkins and Farris Mine roads); $351,054 for reconstruction and surface treating of Route 764 (Rock Creek Road); and $50,000 for the general overlaying of existing plant mix to various roads.
According to the CTB report, reductions to administrative programs and other services will account for more than $1 billion in cost cutting measures.
The CTB will finalize the revised program in January.
“We are holding this unusual mid-year revision of the six-year program because of the significant changes to the official transportation revenue estimate,” said Secretary of Transportation Pierce Homer.
“This revised plan cuts $1.3 billion from our six-year program in addition to the $1.1 billion we had to remove from this plan when we ratified it in June. As transportation revenues continue to shrink, we must develop a fiscally responsible program to govern transportation investment in the commonwealth.”
In the draft plan released to the CTB in December, the $10.6 billion program adopted in June was reduced to $9.3 billion with cuts to all highway systems including:
• $614.9 million in interstate funds;
• $240 million in primary road funds;
• $198.6 million in secondary road funds; and
• $89.5 million in urban road funds
“As we developed these revisions to the program,” Homer said, “we focused on maximizing federal funding, continuing project phases that are already under way, and developing needed projects for safety, bridges and reconstructing existing infrastructure. However, there are simply more needs than we have funding available.”
The revised program, lists of individual project impacts by VDOT district, and copies of the presentations given to the CTB are posted at www.VirginiaDOT.org.