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Notable residents pass away

Pulaski County lost a number of its most prominent citizens in 2008.
These citizens came from a variety of backgrounds and held numerous positions, but the one thing they all had in common was their service to both the local community and to this country.
In April, one of Pulaski County’s residents, Staff Sgt. Jesse Ault, 28, died serving his country in Iraq.
Ault, who was a member of the Virginia National Guard, died as the result of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device struck his vehicle while conducting convoy operations south of Baghdad. He was the second soldier from Pulaski County to die in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
After his death, Ault was promoted to staff sergeant, according to the National Guard, and was recommended for the Bronze Star Medal, the Combat Action Badge, and the Purple Heart.
Ault was a native of West Virginia and 1998 graduate of Tyler County High School in W.V., but moved to Dublin where he lived with his wife, Betsy, his young children Adam and Rachel, and stepson, Nathan.
In a statement released by Betsy Ault, she called her husband "a loving and dedicated father and husband and a brave and loyal soldier."
Later in April, Dr. Forrest Benedict "Fess" Green, 67, a Radford University professor, died as the result of injuries sustained in a wreck between his bicycle and a car, at the intersection of Main Street and New River Drive, near the entrance to Bisset Park in Radford. The driver of the car was later charged with reckless driving.
Green was the author of "Wilderness Road Odyssey: A Cyclist’s Journey Through Present and Past" and was helping to organize an effort to make the Wilderness Road a tourist route. His book chronicles his 850-mile bicycle trip from Pennsylvania to Kentucky along what some call the Wilderness Trail, America’s oldest western migration route.
He was also a Vietnam veteran, having served in the U.S. Navy from 1964 to 1968.
"Fess Green’s service to making the New River Valley a better place to live included his active support for the environment through his participation in the City of Radford Pathways organization and the New River Valley Bicycle Association," according to a resolution passed in honor of Green after his death by the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors.
His "active involvement" led to the development of the Radford City trail system "jointly enjoyed by the citizens of Radford City and Pulaski County," the resolution stated.
In May, Winston Thomas Snead, 88, who served as a Pulaski County representative on Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment, passed away just a day after attending the authority’s May meeting.
Snead was a member of the Pulaski County Public Service Authority Board of Directors since January 1997; the Pulaski County Sewerage Authority since 1978, serving as chairman since 1984; and was an original member of PFRWTA since 1978.
Snead worked for the United States Army Corp of Engineers on Southside Virginia dam projects before becoming a government inspector at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant in the 1950s.
A Resolution of Appreciation adopted by Pulaski County Board of Supervisors stated that Snead was a business, civic and church group leader in Pulaski County for 50 years, and that he was a "respected spokesman for the interest of the citizens and families of the eastern portion of" the county, particularly Fairlawn; and that he "contributed countless hours of service" to the betterment of the county.
Just two days after Snead passed away, Pulaski County lost another prominent citizen, Dr. Anthony William Anneski, 84, a retired optometrist who, throughout his career, cared for the vision needs of many in the local community.
Born in New Jersey, Anneski was a graduate of Emory & Henry College, received a master’s degree in education from Virginia Tech and graduated from Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tenn.
He was a fellow of the Virginia Academy of Optometry, serving as secretary, vice-president and president, and the American College of Optometric Physicians, where he was a president and served on the board of directors.
He was a former representative of Pulaski County’s on the New River Valley Mental Health and Mental Retardation Service Board, having served two terms as chairman.
His civic activities included being past president and a lifetime member of the Dublin Lions Club and serving as a past chairman of the Town of Pulaski’s Planning Commission.
He served with the 442nd Aircraft Carrier Division in France and Germany during World War II.
Although he was dedicated to his hometown, Pulaski, his optometric service did not stop at its border. He traveled to the Dominican Republic with an Illinois Christian Medical Group to examine the eyes of citizens there and fit them with glasses. He also provided services to members of a leprosy community.
In June, 89-year-old Archa Vaughan Jr., a former banker in Pulaski County, passed away.
"He was a good friend and a wonderful gentleman with an exceptional sense of humor," according to local attorney Thomas McCarthy, Jr..
Vaughan was a 1942 graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and a military veteran, having served in the Pacific during World War II. After returning from military service, he taught at Rich Valley High School and Marion High School.
He later turned to a career in finance and banking, working in Abingdon, Pulaski and Dublin. When he retired from Wachovia, he turned to his love of farming.
Vaughan was a member and former elder at the First Presbyterian Church of Pulaski. He was associated with a number of fraternal and civic organizations, including the Lion’s, Elks and Pulaski Science clubs; and was a member of Pythagoras Masonic Lodge and was a Shriner.
He also served on the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors from 1968 to 1979 and was chairman from 1972 to 1979.
In addition, he served on the Public Service Authority and on the board of directors of the Southwest Virginia Cattleman’s Association and the Pulaski County Livestock Market.
In July, Pulaski County lost Virginia Collier Kelly MacNeal, a native of Georgia who spent the later part of her life in this area and contributed to the local community through service.
The Pulaski Library bears a plaque with her name, noted as Chairman of the C.E. Richardson Memorial Library, 1984, for the significant fund-raising campaign resulting in the library expansion. Later she was a vital part of the establishment of the Charles and Ona B. Free Library in Dublin. She also served on the State Library Board as well as on the local Friends of the Library Board.
In addition, MacNeal raised money for the children’s wing of the University of Virginia Hospital, the renovations of the Pulaski Train Depot into a museum and visitor center, and the Fine Arts Center. She was a past president of the Southwest Virginia Women’s Medical Auxillary and helped start the hospital volunteer group, and also volunteered on the Red Cross Bloodmobile.
She led town beautification projects, especially "daffodil hill" off U.S. 11 in town, and the December decoration of the gazebo at the park and the town office building.
Known as a woman of vision and persistence, MacNeal was voted Southwest Times Woman of the Year in 1983.
MacNeal was a faithful member of First Baptist Church, the Joy Sunday School Class, and served as Sunday School Superintendent. She was also active with the Thursday Club’s regular meetings to discuss current events.
In October, Joe Shumate, the former CEO of Coleman Furniture Corporation, died at his home at age 79.
Shumate was employed by Coleman Furniture for more than 30 years, ultimately rising to the position of chairman of the board of directors. Ultimately, Coleman was purchased by Pulaski Furniture Corporation and Shumate retired.
Thornton G. (Corky) Wampler, who was employed by Pulaski Furniture, called Shumate a "hard-nosed competitor." However, he added that Shumate "always acted in a gentlemanly manner whether at the poker table or in a business transaction."
Shumate was born in Martinsville, and was a graduate of Riverside Military Academy, Davidson College and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
He also served in the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict.
Earlier this month, Pulaski County lost 82-year-old Hugh White Huff, Jr., more commonly known as "H.W."
Huff was president of Huff Coal and Oil Company and Chairman of the Board of Huff Petroleum in Pulaski. He was also founder and general partner of the Downtown East Development and Chairman of the Board of Bond Cote of Virginia.
In addition, Huff served on the Board of Pulaski, Bristol, and Roanoke Banks of Virginia, and served as the Chairman of Finance, Trustee, and Board of Stewards for First United Methodist Church in Pulaski.
He also served as chairman of the Pulaski Public Service Authority and on the board of the New River Airport Commission.
Huff was a charter and former member of the Pulaski Jaycees, Coffee and Elks Clubs. He was also a Harris Fellow and continuous oldest member of the Pulaski Rotary Club.
Huff was a member of the Pulaski American Legion, and was a military veteran, having served in the U.S. Army with the 376th Airborne 82NO Division as a paratrooper in Europe during World War II.
In addition, Huff served on the Pulaski Merchants Council and was a member of the Pulaski Science Club.
Huff also made numerous contributions to education as a founding member of and contributor to New River Community College’s Educational Foundation.
He also recently established the Ann Huff Book Fund which, according to Dr. Mark Rowh, executive director of the NRCC Educational Foundation, "has already benefited hundreds of students with the purchase of their textbooks.”
Huff was also a recipient of NRCC’s highest award, the "Friendship Award."
In addition, he received the "Business Executive of the Year" award from the Pulaski County Chamber of Commerce in 1983.

Notable residents pass away

Pulaski County lost a number of its most prominent citizens in 2008.
These citizens came from a variety of backgrounds and held numerous positions, but the one thing they all had in common was their service to both the local community and to this country.
In April, one of Pulaski County’s residents, Staff Sgt. Jesse Ault, 28, died serving his country in Iraq.
Ault, who was a member of the Virginia National Guard, died as the result of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device struck his vehicle while conducting convoy operations south of Baghdad. He was the second soldier from Pulaski County to die in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
After his death, Ault was promoted to staff sergeant, according to the National Guard, and was recommended for the Bronze Star Medal, the Combat Action Badge, and the Purple Heart.
Ault was a native of West Virginia and 1998 graduate of Tyler County High School in W.V., but moved to Dublin where he lived with his wife, Betsy, his young children Adam and Rachel, and stepson, Nathan.
In a statement released by Betsy Ault, she called her husband "a loving and dedicated father and husband and a brave and loyal soldier."
Later in April, Dr. Forrest Benedict "Fess" Green, 67, a Radford University professor, died as the result of injuries sustained in a wreck between his bicycle and a car, at the intersection of Main Street and New River Drive, near the entrance to Bisset Park in Radford. The driver of the car was later charged with reckless driving.
Green was the author of "Wilderness Road Odyssey: A Cyclist’s Journey Through Present and Past" and was helping to organize an effort to make the Wilderness Road a tourist route. His book chronicles his 850-mile bicycle trip from Pennsylvania to Kentucky along what some call the Wilderness Trail, America’s oldest western migration route.
He was also a Vietnam veteran, having served in the U.S. Navy from 1964 to 1968.
"Fess Green’s service to making the New River Valley a better place to live included his active support for the environment through his participation in the City of Radford Pathways organization and the New River Valley Bicycle Association," according to a resolution passed in honor of Green after his death by the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors.
His "active involvement" led to the development of the Radford City trail system "jointly enjoyed by the citizens of Radford City and Pulaski County," the resolution stated.
In May, Winston Thomas Snead, 88, who served as a Pulaski County representative on Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment, passed away just a day after attending the authority’s May meeting.
Snead was a member of the Pulaski County Public Service Authority Board of Directors since January 1997; the Pulaski County Sewerage Authority since 1978, serving as chairman since 1984; and was an original member of PFRWTA since 1978.
Snead worked for the United States Army Corp of Engineers on Southside Virginia dam projects before becoming a government inspector at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant in the 1950s.
A Resolution of Appreciation adopted by Pulaski County Board of Supervisors stated that Snead was a business, civic and church group leader in Pulaski County for 50 years, and that he was a "respected spokesman for the interest of the citizens and families of the eastern portion of" the county, particularly Fairlawn; and that he "contributed countless hours of service" to the betterment of the county.
Just two days after Snead passed away, Pulaski County lost another prominent citizen, Dr. Anthony William Anneski, 84, a retired optometrist who, throughout his career, cared for the vision needs of many in the local community.
Born in New Jersey, Anneski was a graduate of Emory & Henry College, received a master’s degree in education from Virginia Tech and graduated from Southern College of Optometry in Memphis, Tenn.
He was a fellow of the Virginia Academy of Optometry, serving as secretary, vice-president and president, and the American College of Optometric Physicians, where he was a president and served on the board of directors.
He was a former representative of Pulaski County’s on the New River Valley Mental Health and Mental Retardation Service Board, having served two terms as chairman.
His civic activities included being past president and a lifetime member of the Dublin Lions Club and serving as a past chairman of the Town of Pulaski’s Planning Commission.
He served with the 442nd Aircraft Carrier Division in France and Germany during World War II.
Although he was dedicated to his hometown, Pulaski, his optometric service did not stop at its border. He traveled to the Dominican Republic with an Illinois Christian Medical Group to examine the eyes of citizens there and fit them with glasses. He also provided services to members of a leprosy community.
In June, 89-year-old Archa Vaughan Jr., a former banker in Pulaski County, passed away.
"He was a good friend and a wonderful gentleman with an exceptional sense of humor," according to local attorney Thomas McCarthy, Jr..
Vaughan was a 1942 graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and a military veteran, having served in the Pacific during World War II. After returning from military service, he taught at Rich Valley High School and Marion High School.
He later turned to a career in finance and banking, working in Abingdon, Pulaski and Dublin. When he retired from Wachovia, he turned to his love of farming.
Vaughan was a member and former elder at the First Presbyterian Church of Pulaski. He was associated with a number of fraternal and civic organizations, including the Lion’s, Elks and Pulaski Science clubs; and was a member of Pythagoras Masonic Lodge and was a Shriner.
He also served on the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors from 1968 to 1979 and was chairman from 1972 to 1979.
In addition, he served on the Public Service Authority and on the board of directors of the Southwest Virginia Cattleman’s Association and the Pulaski County Livestock Market.
In July, Pulaski County lost Virginia Collier Kelly MacNeal, a native of Georgia who spent the later part of her life in this area and contributed to the local community through service.
The Pulaski Library bears a plaque with her name, noted as Chairman of the C.E. Richardson Memorial Library, 1984, for the significant fund-raising campaign resulting in the library expansion. Later she was a vital part of the establishment of the Charles and Ona B. Free Library in Dublin. She also served on the State Library Board as well as on the local Friends of the Library Board.
In addition, MacNeal raised money for the children’s wing of the University of Virginia Hospital, the renovations of the Pulaski Train Depot into a museum and visitor center, and the Fine Arts Center. She was a past president of the Southwest Virginia Women’s Medical Auxillary and helped start the hospital volunteer group, and also volunteered on the Red Cross Bloodmobile.
She led town beautification projects, especially "daffodil hill" off U.S. 11 in town, and the December decoration of the gazebo at the park and the town office building.
Known as a woman of vision and persistence, MacNeal was voted Southwest Times Woman of the Year in 1983.
MacNeal was a faithful member of First Baptist Church, the Joy Sunday School Class, and served as Sunday School Superintendent. She was also active with the Thursday Club’s regular meetings to discuss current events.
In October, Joe Shumate, the former CEO of Coleman Furniture Corporation, died at his home at age 79.
Shumate was employed by Coleman Furniture for more than 30 years, ultimately rising to the position of chairman of the board of directors. Ultimately, Coleman was purchased by Pulaski Furniture Corporation and Shumate retired.
Thornton G. (Corky) Wampler, who was employed by Pulaski Furniture, called Shumate a "hard-nosed competitor." However, he added that Shumate "always acted in a gentlemanly manner whether at the poker table or in a business transaction."
Shumate was born in Martinsville, and was a graduate of Riverside Military Academy, Davidson College and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
He also served in the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict.
Earlier this month, Pulaski County lost 82-year-old Hugh White Huff, Jr., more commonly known as "H.W."
Huff was president of Huff Coal and Oil Company and Chairman of the Board of Huff Petroleum in Pulaski. He was also founder and general partner of the Downtown East Development and Chairman of the Board of Bond Cote of Virginia.
In addition, Huff served on the Board of Pulaski, Bristol, and Roanoke Banks of Virginia, and served as the Chairman of Finance, Trustee, and Board of Stewards for First United Methodist Church in Pulaski.
He also served as chairman of the Pulaski Public Service Authority and on the board of the New River Airport Commission.
Huff was a charter and former member of the Pulaski Jaycees, Coffee and Elks Clubs. He was also a Harris Fellow and continuous oldest member of the Pulaski Rotary Club.
Huff was a member of the Pulaski American Legion, and was a military veteran, having served in the U.S. Army with the 376th Airborne 82NO Division as a paratrooper in Europe during World War II.
In addition, Huff served on the Pulaski Merchants Council and was a member of the Pulaski Science Club.
Huff also made numerous contributions to education as a founding member of and contributor to New River Community College’s Educational Foundation.
He also recently established the Ann Huff Book Fund which, according to Dr. Mark Rowh, executive director of the NRCC Educational Foundation, "has already benefited hundreds of students with the purchase of their textbooks.”
Huff was also a recipient of NRCC’s highest award, the "Friendship Award."
In addition, he received the "Business Executive of the Year" award from the Pulaski County Chamber of Commerce in 1983.