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Pulaski needs help

The Town of Pulaski needs you.
Town officials are seeking volunteers to help with restoration of artifacts that were recovered from the train station after an early morning fire in November heavily damaged the facility.
Town Economic Development Director John White said 80 fabric items, 450 “three-dimensional” objects (such as signs, tools and furniture) and more than 300 photographs and paper items were recovered. Now they all have to be restored in a timely manner.
To reach that end, a restoration training class will be held at 9 a.m. tomorrow at the National Guard Armory so volunteers can learn how to restore or preserve items.
The volunteers will then have the opportunity to go to one of the five secure sites where items are being stored and put what they learned to work.
The Department of Historic Registry is assisting with the efforts and training. Town staff and some volunteers already have been working on the objects over the past three weeks.
White said the recent cold weather has “ironically” become the most important preservation tool at hand. He said it was so cold the night of the fire that ice formed on objects and “helped slow the deterioration process.” Some of the more fragile paper items are being stored in a freezer until they can be processed.
Everything removed from the fire was “wet and smoky,” according to White. Plus, fire charred a number of items.
White recognized that some items were saved through “all the heroic efforts of fire fighters and public works employees who entered the building, dragging artifacts out of harm” while the building was on fire.
He also noted that the town should thank a number of people from outside the area who have helped out since the train station was damaged. Among those were: Terry Nicholson of the Town of Blacksburg; Lori Tolliver-Jones of Smithfield Plantation at Virginia Tech; Terry Fisher of the Andrew Johnson Museum in Pearisburg; and Llyn Sharpe from Virginia Tech.
He also recognized Betty Lou Kirkner, who directs the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Museum, as “a tremendous source of information, inspiration and hard work;” and Doc Holliday who is assisting with restoration of model train objects.
As for the future, White said, “We’re going to follow the lead of the experts at the Department of Historic Resources.”
He added that it appears town insurance may approve of the town hiring “at least a part-time museum disaster recovery coordinator.” The job description includes “familiarity with museum best practices, conservation, and proper handling of objects.”

Pulaski needs help

The Town of Pulaski needs you.
Town officials are seeking volunteers to help with restoration of artifacts that were recovered from the train station after an early morning fire in November heavily damaged the facility.
Town Economic Development Director John White said 80 fabric items, 450 “three-dimensional” objects (such as signs, tools and furniture) and more than 300 photographs and paper items were recovered. Now they all have to be restored in a timely manner.
To reach that end, a restoration training class will be held at 9 a.m. tomorrow at the National Guard Armory so volunteers can learn how to restore or preserve items.
The volunteers will then have the opportunity to go to one of the five secure sites where items are being stored and put what they learned to work.
The Department of Historic Registry is assisting with the efforts and training. Town staff and some volunteers already have been working on the objects over the past three weeks.
White said the recent cold weather has “ironically” become the most important preservation tool at hand. He said it was so cold the night of the fire that ice formed on objects and “helped slow the deterioration process.” Some of the more fragile paper items are being stored in a freezer until they can be processed.
Everything removed from the fire was “wet and smoky,” according to White. Plus, fire charred a number of items.
White recognized that some items were saved through “all the heroic efforts of fire fighters and public works employees who entered the building, dragging artifacts out of harm” while the building was on fire.
He also noted that the town should thank a number of people from outside the area who have helped out since the train station was damaged. Among those were: Terry Nicholson of the Town of Blacksburg; Lori Tolliver-Jones of Smithfield Plantation at Virginia Tech; Terry Fisher of the Andrew Johnson Museum in Pearisburg; and Llyn Sharpe from Virginia Tech.
He also recognized Betty Lou Kirkner, who directs the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Museum, as “a tremendous source of information, inspiration and hard work;” and Doc Holliday who is assisting with restoration of model train objects.
As for the future, White said, “We’re going to follow the lead of the experts at the Department of Historic Resources.”
He added that it appears town insurance may approve of the town hiring “at least a part-time museum disaster recovery coordinator.” The job description includes “familiarity with museum best practices, conservation, and proper handling of objects.”