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Pulaski’s Historic Train Station Destroyed by fire

The Town of Pulaski lost a piece of its history early Monday morning when the historic Pulaski Train Station succumbed to a fire.
As of this morning, Pulaski Fire Chief Bill Webb said the station is a "total loss."
The Pulaski Fire Department received word of the fire just after midnight Monday morning and arrived at the station, located at the corner of South Washington Avenue and Dora Highway in Pulaski, according to Webb.
Webb said when firefighters arrived on the scene, there were clear signs of heavy fire and smoke within the station, so they quickly began fire suppression operations.
He noted that in addition to the Pulaski Fire Department, numerous other local first responders aided in the operation, including the Draper, Newbern and Dublin fire departments, along with the Fairlawn Fire Department and the county air truck, REMSI and the Pulaski Police Department.
While the majority of the fire was suppressed within several hours, Webb said that his department was still working at the train station this morning. He added that at this point, they are mainly trying to salvage any historic artifacts located within the station, and noted that they had managed to save a few, which are being placed in storage.
The Pulaski Train Station, which first opened in 1888, was home to the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Memorial Museum and was listed on the National Historic Register.
While Webb did not have an estimate of the exact numeric value of damage caused by the fire, he did comment that no value could be placed on the artifacts, as they are "irreplaceable."
In addition to salvaging artifacts, the department has embarked upon an investigation of the origin of the fire.
At this time, Webb said the department has no definite answer for what caused the fire.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley commented that the town’s main concern at this point is preserving as much from the museum as possible.
He added that town staff would be meeting with an architect from the Virginia Department of Historic Preservation on Tuesday morning for advice on preserving what is left of the building and artifacts.
"The fire comes as a heartbreaking loss to all citizens," commented Town of Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell.
He also said that there are many questions yet to be answered, including the possibility of rebuilding the station. He added that the town’s council and administration will be addressing all issues in the coming days.
Hawley noted that time would be taken during Tuesday night’s Pulaski Town Council meeting to discuss the situation.

Photos by Melinda Williams

Pulaski’s Historic Train Station Destroyed by fire

The Town of Pulaski lost a piece of its history early Monday morning when the historic Pulaski Train Station succumbed to a fire.
As of this morning, Pulaski Fire Chief Bill Webb said the station is a "total loss."
The Pulaski Fire Department received word of the fire just after midnight Monday morning and arrived at the station, located at the corner of South Washington Avenue and Dora Highway in Pulaski, according to Webb.
Webb said when firefighters arrived on the scene, there were clear signs of heavy fire and smoke within the station, so they quickly began fire suppression operations.
He noted that in addition to the Pulaski Fire Department, numerous other local first responders aided in the operation, including the Draper, Newbern and Dublin fire departments, along with the Fairlawn Fire Department and the county air truck, REMSI and the Pulaski Police Department.
While the majority of the fire was suppressed within several hours, Webb said that his department was still working at the train station this morning. He added that at this point, they are mainly trying to salvage any historic artifacts located within the station, and noted that they had managed to save a few, which are being placed in storage.
The Pulaski Train Station, which first opened in 1888, was home to the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Memorial Museum and was listed on the National Historic Register.
While Webb did not have an estimate of the exact numeric value of damage caused by the fire, he did comment that no value could be placed on the artifacts, as they are "irreplaceable."
In addition to salvaging artifacts, the department has embarked upon an investigation of the origin of the fire.
At this time, Webb said the department has no definite answer for what caused the fire.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley commented that the town’s main concern at this point is preserving as much from the museum as possible.
He added that town staff would be meeting with an architect from the Virginia Department of Historic Preservation on Tuesday morning for advice on preserving what is left of the building and artifacts.
"The fire comes as a heartbreaking loss to all citizens," commented Town of Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell.
He also said that there are many questions yet to be answered, including the possibility of rebuilding the station. He added that the town’s council and administration will be addressing all issues in the coming days.
Hawley noted that time would be taken during Tuesday night’s Pulaski Town Council meeting to discuss the situation.

Photos by Melinda Williams