Duncan Suzuki

Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Democrats hold rally in Pulaski

“What a great day to be a Democrat in Pulaski County,” said Pulaski County Democratic Party Chairman Mike Fleenor.
On Saturday morning, Fleenor greeted a packed crowd gathered for a Democratic rally at the Masonic Lodge in Pulaski.
Along with party members, interested citizens and local leaders, special guests included Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine, U.S. Senate candidate Mark Warner, Congressman Rick Boucher, and Virginia state senators John Edwards and Phillip Puckett.
“This is the biggest crowd we’ve seen in Pulaski at this event,” Puckett said, as he addressed the crowd. “Thanks for being here today and for being a part of the change that’s moving across this country. We have a great opportunity Tuesday to be a part of history and change that will set this country on the right track.”
Following Puckett, Sen. Edwards spoke and said, “I can’t think of another election that is more significant in American history than this one.”
He said the last one he recalled that could compare was in 1932 when Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president and “ended the trickle-down, failed Hoover economic policy.”
Edwards said, for the last seven or eight years, this country has seen the failure of the Republican trickle-down economic policy, but he believes that Sen. Barack Obama, the Democratic presidential candidate, can change that.
“Barack Obama is going to usher in a new era of investing in people and investing in infrastructure and roads and bridges and schools and housing, and building our economy from the ground up. And that’s the only sustainable way to build our economy,” Edwards said, adding that he hopes after Tuesday, it will be the “end of an era and the beginning of a new era for economic policy, but also, the end of an era in politics.”
Boucher addressed the crowd as well and jokingly — seeing as how he is running unopposed — said, “As of today, my campaign for re-election is going pretty well.”
But, on a more serious note, he said, “I want to thank you so much for what you’ve done for me.” He added that he thinks he knows why he’s not opposed this year,
“I think this year the Republicans knew something that it was about time they figured out and that is that my success has little to do with me and really has everything to do with you. What they saw is if they opposed me, you would stand behind me, you would work extraordinarily hard on my behalf and because of what you would do, we would succeed anyway, so they decided just not to try this year,” Boucher said.
As for Obama, Boucher said, “I could not be more excited about our national ticket.”
He went on to say that “this nominee (Obama) holds terrific promise, more promise for success in his presidency than anyone who has carried our party’s banner or the other party’s banner.”
Boucher added, “He (Obama) has terrific promise to restore our nation’s economy” and to “restore our standing in the world after our image has been tarnished by the eight failed years of the Bush administration.”
“Sen. Obama will be a terrific president, unifying this country and making all of us as Democrats and as Americans proud. But he’s only going to win with your help and support,” he said.
Kaine addressed the crowd after Boucher, and Kaine said, “It’s great to be back in southwest Virginia.”
Kaine said Obama came to Virginia to campaign for him when he was running for governor, and they soon realized that their mothers are from the same “tiny farm town” in southern Kansas.
“I knew a little bit about where (Obama) came from, and he knew that about me and we started a friendship,” Kaine said.
He added, “I got on board very early with Sen. Obama’s campaign, and I was the first person statewide to officially endorse him.”
Kaine went on to say that through being involved with Obama’s campaign, he has become “so confident in his character” and that he “knows Barack and Michelle very well and I feel completely confident that he’ll be an outstanding president.”
Warner was the last to address the crowd.
He said, “There is no place that Tim Kaine and I would rather be the weekend before the election than southwest Virginia.”
Warner said that this year’s election really is significant, and added “we’ve got a chance to turn things around.”
Warner went on to say that from where Obama started this campaign and now four days out from Election Day, he is “more confident and more sure than ever that this is the right man to be president of the U.S.”
As for his personal campaign, Warner offered three “sound bytes” to share with voters about why the should make him their choice.
He said, “One, I don’t need a road map to find southwest Virginia, and I know Virginia doesn’t end at Roanoke.”
As for the second, he said, “I have had first-hand experience in cleaning up Republican fiscal messes,” and, for the third reason, he said, “Just remember the guy who got the Virginia Tech Hokies in the ACC.”

Democrats hold rally in Pulaski

“What a great day to be a Democrat in Pulaski County,” said Pulaski County Democratic Party Chairman Mike Fleenor.
On Saturday morning, Fleenor greeted a packed crowd gathered for a Democratic rally at the Masonic Lodge in Pulaski.
Along with party members, interested citizens and local leaders, special guests included Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine, U.S. Senate candidate Mark Warner, Congressman Rick Boucher, and Virginia state senators John Edwards and Phillip Puckett.
“This is the biggest crowd we’ve seen in Pulaski at this event,” Puckett said, as he addressed the crowd. “Thanks for being here today and for being a part of the change that’s moving across this country. We have a great opportunity Tuesday to be a part of history and change that will set this country on the right track.”
Following Puckett, Sen. Edwards spoke and said, “I can’t think of another election that is more significant in American history than this one.”
He said the last one he recalled that could compare was in 1932 when Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president and “ended the trickle-down, failed Hoover economic policy.”
Edwards said, for the last seven or eight years, this country has seen the failure of the Republican trickle-down economic policy, but he believes that Sen. Barack Obama, the Democratic presidential candidate, can change that.
“Barack Obama is going to usher in a new era of investing in people and investing in infrastructure and roads and bridges and schools and housing, and building our economy from the ground up. And that’s the only sustainable way to build our economy,” Edwards said, adding that he hopes after Tuesday, it will be the “end of an era and the beginning of a new era for economic policy, but also, the end of an era in politics.”
Boucher addressed the crowd as well and jokingly — seeing as how he is running unopposed — said, “As of today, my campaign for re-election is going pretty well.”
But, on a more serious note, he said, “I want to thank you so much for what you’ve done for me.” He added that he thinks he knows why he’s not opposed this year,
“I think this year the Republicans knew something that it was about time they figured out and that is that my success has little to do with me and really has everything to do with you. What they saw is if they opposed me, you would stand behind me, you would work extraordinarily hard on my behalf and because of what you would do, we would succeed anyway, so they decided just not to try this year,” Boucher said.
As for Obama, Boucher said, “I could not be more excited about our national ticket.”
He went on to say that “this nominee (Obama) holds terrific promise, more promise for success in his presidency than anyone who has carried our party’s banner or the other party’s banner.”
Boucher added, “He (Obama) has terrific promise to restore our nation’s economy” and to “restore our standing in the world after our image has been tarnished by the eight failed years of the Bush administration.”
“Sen. Obama will be a terrific president, unifying this country and making all of us as Democrats and as Americans proud. But he’s only going to win with your help and support,” he said.
Kaine addressed the crowd after Boucher, and Kaine said, “It’s great to be back in southwest Virginia.”
Kaine said Obama came to Virginia to campaign for him when he was running for governor, and they soon realized that their mothers are from the same “tiny farm town” in southern Kansas.
“I knew a little bit about where (Obama) came from, and he knew that about me and we started a friendship,” Kaine said.
He added, “I got on board very early with Sen. Obama’s campaign, and I was the first person statewide to officially endorse him.”
Kaine went on to say that through being involved with Obama’s campaign, he has become “so confident in his character” and that he “knows Barack and Michelle very well and I feel completely confident that he’ll be an outstanding president.”
Warner was the last to address the crowd.
He said, “There is no place that Tim Kaine and I would rather be the weekend before the election than southwest Virginia.”
Warner said that this year’s election really is significant, and added “we’ve got a chance to turn things around.”
Warner went on to say that from where Obama started this campaign and now four days out from Election Day, he is “more confident and more sure than ever that this is the right man to be president of the U.S.”
As for his personal campaign, Warner offered three “sound bytes” to share with voters about why the should make him their choice.
He said, “One, I don’t need a road map to find southwest Virginia, and I know Virginia doesn’t end at Roanoke.”
As for the second, he said, “I have had first-hand experience in cleaning up Republican fiscal messes,” and, for the third reason, he said, “Just remember the guy who got the Virginia Tech Hokies in the ACC.”