Duncan Suzuki

Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Group wants to renovate Jefferson School

Former Jefferson School students may have a chance to make the building their home if a North Carolina company is able to obtain government funding to rehabilitate the structure.
Town Manager John Hawley said The Landmark Group has indicated a desire to move forward with a residential project at Jefferson School if the company is able to obtain Virginia Housing Development Administration (VHDA) tax credits.
To improve the ability for Landmark to receive approval of the tax credits, Hawley said it is important that the town and non-profit housing groups agree to participate.
At its meeting Tuesday night, the Pulaski Town Council voted to participate in the program by making a $10,000 loan to Pulaski Redevelopment and Housing Authority to be used for the rehabilitation project. The Council also agreed to waive building permit and water/sewer connection and availability fees.
The town also agreed to some real estate tax abatement on the project, but the amount and time frame of the abatement will need to be negotiated.
“This would be huge if they (Landmark) are able to deal with (Jefferson School) without us having to bulldozer it,” Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said.
Councilman David Clark agreed, saying the town’s contribution is small in comparison to what rehabilitation of the school would do for that side of town.
Landmark is a company that specializes in turning historic buildings into viable living space. The group has developed more than $350 million in properties through adaptive reuse and new construction. It oversees the projects through development, construction and management of the completed project.
Rex Todd, president of Todd Development Inc., an affiliate of The Landmark Group, gave a presentation to town council at its Oct. 7 meeting.
In addition to Jefferson School, Todd said Landmark has looked at the Jackson Building on West Main Street, the Dalton Building on Washington Avenue and the former Appalachian Power building across the street from it, the Virginia Foods building and the Virginia Woodworks building for other potential projects.
Hawley said town staff checked with officials in other localities where Landmark has completed projects, and everyone has had a positive view of the group and its work.
Hawley said Todd indicated the company has rehabilitated buildings in worse shape than Jefferson School.
When it comes to a tax abatement, Hawley said, “We’ll still get the base tax on the building. We’ll just be foregoing the tax on improvements to the building.”

Glenn Baublitz, a local contractor who recently was appointed to the town’s Industrial Development Authority, said the IDA may be able to work with Landmark on some funding for the project.
He said he worked with Landmark Group in Lynchburg and “they’re a well-organized group of businessmen.”
Baublitz said Landmark’s workmanship would be a “blessing” for the town, but he warned council members to be cautious of what it gives away for the project.
“I don’t want to see the town get taken advantage of,” he said, noting that Landmark “is a for-profit group.”
Baublitz noted that he spoke with building inspectors in some of the localities where Landmark has completed projects, and “they had no problems with” the company.
Hawley said he would direct Todd to the IDA for possible funds.

Group wants to renovate Jefferson School

Former Jefferson School students may have a chance to make the building their home if a North Carolina company is able to obtain government funding to rehabilitate the structure.
Town Manager John Hawley said The Landmark Group has indicated a desire to move forward with a residential project at Jefferson School if the company is able to obtain Virginia Housing Development Administration (VHDA) tax credits.
To improve the ability for Landmark to receive approval of the tax credits, Hawley said it is important that the town and non-profit housing groups agree to participate.
At its meeting Tuesday night, the Pulaski Town Council voted to participate in the program by making a $10,000 loan to Pulaski Redevelopment and Housing Authority to be used for the rehabilitation project. The Council also agreed to waive building permit and water/sewer connection and availability fees.
The town also agreed to some real estate tax abatement on the project, but the amount and time frame of the abatement will need to be negotiated.
“This would be huge if they (Landmark) are able to deal with (Jefferson School) without us having to bulldozer it,” Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said.
Councilman David Clark agreed, saying the town’s contribution is small in comparison to what rehabilitation of the school would do for that side of town.
Landmark is a company that specializes in turning historic buildings into viable living space. The group has developed more than $350 million in properties through adaptive reuse and new construction. It oversees the projects through development, construction and management of the completed project.
Rex Todd, president of Todd Development Inc., an affiliate of The Landmark Group, gave a presentation to town council at its Oct. 7 meeting.
In addition to Jefferson School, Todd said Landmark has looked at the Jackson Building on West Main Street, the Dalton Building on Washington Avenue and the former Appalachian Power building across the street from it, the Virginia Foods building and the Virginia Woodworks building for other potential projects.
Hawley said town staff checked with officials in other localities where Landmark has completed projects, and everyone has had a positive view of the group and its work.
Hawley said Todd indicated the company has rehabilitated buildings in worse shape than Jefferson School.
When it comes to a tax abatement, Hawley said, “We’ll still get the base tax on the building. We’ll just be foregoing the tax on improvements to the building.”

Glenn Baublitz, a local contractor who recently was appointed to the town’s Industrial Development Authority, said the IDA may be able to work with Landmark on some funding for the project.
He said he worked with Landmark Group in Lynchburg and “they’re a well-organized group of businessmen.”
Baublitz said Landmark’s workmanship would be a “blessing” for the town, but he warned council members to be cautious of what it gives away for the project.
“I don’t want to see the town get taken advantage of,” he said, noting that Landmark “is a for-profit group.”
Baublitz noted that he spoke with building inspectors in some of the localities where Landmark has completed projects, and “they had no problems with” the company.
Hawley said he would direct Todd to the IDA for possible funds.