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Kennedy visits Pulaski

Max Kennedy, a son of the late Robert F. Kennedy and his wife Ethel, paid a visit to Pulaski Tuesday afternoon during a campaign swing through southwestern Virginia.
“I’m here because I think it is vital that we elect Barack Obama the next president of the United States,” Kennedy said. “I believe the people here in southwest Virginia are going to have a real say of who becomes president of the U.S., and if we can improve Sen. Obama’s standing here, he will win Virginia, and if he wins Virginia, he’ll be the next president of the U.S.”
Besides his short visit to Pulaski Tuesday afternoon, Kennedy and his mother stopped in Marion, Wytheville and Radford. They were scheduled to campaign in Blacksburg and Vinton today.
On his way out of Pulaski, Kennedy said he hoped to be able to stop at the Volvo plant in Dublin.
“When you drive through here, you can see just coming up to this building the evidence of job loss, with that closed factory (Pulaski Furniture) right around the corner,” Kennedy said, noting that there are two and a half times as many people on unemployment as there were eight years ago in Virginia.
“There has been an economic collapse, which is a direct result of the economic policies of the Bush administration, which John McCain has supported throughout his entire career,” Kennedy said.
“We need change. We need it badly, and we need it now,” he said.
Kennedy also expressed his concerns about health care.
“There are so many people across Virginia and the country who don’t have health care,” he said.
“You could come home from one or two days in the hospital and have a $3,000 bill. The only way we can afford to pay that is to have a health care program that covers everyone, and where we all chip in and help out,” Kennedy said.

When thinking about Obama’s overall campaign, Kennedy said that a Bible phrase, “I’m not my brother’s keeper,” comes to mind. But for Kennedy, he said, the point is that he is his “brother’s keeper,” and, “we’re all in this together.”
“When I look at the changes we’ve gone through in this country over the last eight years, I really see us building a society that I don’t want my children to live in,” Kennedy said.

“I want my children to live in the kind of America that I grew up in, where we care for the least among us and are careful about how we spend our dollars,” Kennedy said.
He added, “I’m a writer. I write American history, and, frankly, that’s what I’d like to be doing. But I can’t sit by now and watch this happen to the country I’m leaving my children.”
As for what kind of response he has received while traveling across the country campaigning for Obama, Kennedy said, “people are more excited about this election than any I’ve ever seen.”
He added, “there are so many people who have gotten involved for the first time in politics for this election.”
“I think people are really understanding that this election is going to be seminal, that people are going to be studying this for a hundred years, and that who we elect is really going to reflect and create the America of the next 50 years,” he said.

Kennedy said that six months ago, there was really strong McCain support in southwest Virginia, but he thinks that has really “withered away” over the last six months.
“You can feel it on the streets. You can feel it when you walk into stores,” Kennedy said.
“People look at what was said in the debates, and they’re starting to get to know Barack Obama and see that this person is responsible,” Kennedy said.
Max Kennedy is the ninth son of the late Robert F. Kennedy, brother of former President John F. Kennedy. Robert Kennedy is a former U.S. attorney general and U.S. senator.
He was assassinated in 1968 while seeking the Democratic presidential nomination.

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Kennedy visits Pulaski

Max Kennedy, a son of the late Robert F. Kennedy and his wife Ethel, paid a visit to Pulaski Tuesday afternoon during a campaign swing through southwestern Virginia.
“I’m here because I think it is vital that we elect Barack Obama the next president of the United States,” Kennedy said. “I believe the people here in southwest Virginia are going to have a real say of who becomes president of the U.S., and if we can improve Sen. Obama’s standing here, he will win Virginia, and if he wins Virginia, he’ll be the next president of the U.S.”
Besides his short visit to Pulaski Tuesday afternoon, Kennedy and his mother stopped in Marion, Wytheville and Radford. They were scheduled to campaign in Blacksburg and Vinton today.
On his way out of Pulaski, Kennedy said he hoped to be able to stop at the Volvo plant in Dublin.
“When you drive through here, you can see just coming up to this building the evidence of job loss, with that closed factory (Pulaski Furniture) right around the corner,” Kennedy said, noting that there are two and a half times as many people on unemployment as there were eight years ago in Virginia.
“There has been an economic collapse, which is a direct result of the economic policies of the Bush administration, which John McCain has supported throughout his entire career,” Kennedy said.
“We need change. We need it badly, and we need it now,” he said.
Kennedy also expressed his concerns about health care.
“There are so many people across Virginia and the country who don’t have health care,” he said.
“You could come home from one or two days in the hospital and have a $3,000 bill. The only way we can afford to pay that is to have a health care program that covers everyone, and where we all chip in and help out,” Kennedy said.

When thinking about Obama’s overall campaign, Kennedy said that a Bible phrase, “I’m not my brother’s keeper,” comes to mind. But for Kennedy, he said, the point is that he is his “brother’s keeper,” and, “we’re all in this together.”
“When I look at the changes we’ve gone through in this country over the last eight years, I really see us building a society that I don’t want my children to live in,” Kennedy said.

“I want my children to live in the kind of America that I grew up in, where we care for the least among us and are careful about how we spend our dollars,” Kennedy said.
He added, “I’m a writer. I write American history, and, frankly, that’s what I’d like to be doing. But I can’t sit by now and watch this happen to the country I’m leaving my children.”
As for what kind of response he has received while traveling across the country campaigning for Obama, Kennedy said, “people are more excited about this election than any I’ve ever seen.”
He added, “there are so many people who have gotten involved for the first time in politics for this election.”
“I think people are really understanding that this election is going to be seminal, that people are going to be studying this for a hundred years, and that who we elect is really going to reflect and create the America of the next 50 years,” he said.

Kennedy said that six months ago, there was really strong McCain support in southwest Virginia, but he thinks that has really “withered away” over the last six months.
“You can feel it on the streets. You can feel it when you walk into stores,” Kennedy said.
“People look at what was said in the debates, and they’re starting to get to know Barack Obama and see that this person is responsible,” Kennedy said.
Max Kennedy is the ninth son of the late Robert F. Kennedy, brother of former President John F. Kennedy. Robert Kennedy is a former U.S. attorney general and U.S. senator.
He was assassinated in 1968 while seeking the Democratic presidential nomination.

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