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Zane Quesenberry

Over the years, Pulaski County has had some remarkable players in it’s defensive secondary. Andre Eaves, Steve Alley, Rodney Landreth and Alan Wheeling to name only a few in the history of the Cougar Football program. A new name may soon be added to that list, however, as a current member of the Cougar team is working his way towards that goal.
Zane Quesenberry, a 5-11, 167-pound, 17-year-old senior safety for Pulaski County, has become both an impact player and a leader for this Cougar squad. In his second year as a starter in the Pulaski secondary, there aren’t too many things that get past him.
In his junior season, Zane was selected as an All-River Ridge District second team safety. He recorded 95 tackles, and led the team in interceptions with his three picks, while also defending several other pass attempts. In the off season, he set his goals and got to work getting bigger, faster and stronger. Quesenberry finished up the off season weight lifting program with a 235-pound bench press max, a 365-pound squat max, and a 235-pound power clean max. After a very productive summer 7-on-7 Camp, Zane went to work with his teammates, and has become a key part of the newly invigorated “Gold Swarm” Cougar defense.
To this point in the season (prior to the Cave Spring game), Zane has recorded 40 tackles, 7 pass deflections, and 6 interceptions. The single season record for interceptions is 8, and that honor is shared by former Cougar standouts Alley (1987), Eaves (1992), and Wheeling (2000). With four regular season games to go, the sure-handed safety needs only two more interceptions to tie that record. Quesenberry also recorded 2 interceptions in his sophomore season, putting his career total at 11. The career interception record stands at 13, and is currently held by current Cougar coaches Landreth (1984-85) and Eaves (1991-94). Should Quesenberry get the two interceptions he needs to tie the single season record, he will also tie the career record.
To talk with Quesenberry, you would never suspect this calm, mild-mannered young man possesses the aggressiveness to put up these kinds of numbers. A quiet, “yes sir, no sir” type of young man, he quietly goes about doing his job both on the field and in the classroom, where he holds a 3.4 GPA. While he certainly is making his mark in football, he is also a solid contributor for the Cougar basketball team and baseball team.
“Zane is the type of kid a coach loves to have on his team,” said Head Coach Jack Turner. “He comes in, he works his tail off for you, he does well in his classes, and he’s very positive. He’s a very intelligent young man, and he picks up on things very quickly when we study our opponents on film. On the field, he is the type of player that will come in and knock somebody for a loop, then help them up and go back to the huddle to get ready for the next play. With his attitude and work habits, he‘s going to make a fine college student, and a fine college athlete.”
While Quesnberry, like most every player on this season’s team, hopes that his best memory of Cougar football is still yet to come, he does have one very special memory that he shared. “My tenth grade year we beat Jefferson Forest in a very tight game the week after “Coach D” (Kenneth J. Dobson) passed away. We were having a pretty rough season, and that was our first win. After the game, I remember everybody was crying and laughing, and we all just kept talking about Ben (Buckland) and how he had kicked the big field goals and how proud ‘Coach D’ would have been. The way we came together as a team and as community was really something I’ll never forget.” Quesenberry recalled.

While Quesenberry is certainly focused on the season right now, he is also looking ahead to his future. “I’m really hoping to go to Elon University. I like the school and what they have to offer, but if that doesn’t work out there are some others I’m interested in as well. My grades are pretty good and I’m involved in a good number of extra curricular activities that colleges like, so I’m hoping for the best.”
When asked what advice he would give to the upcoming rec league and middle school athletes who hope to one day take his spot, Zane was very clear. “No matter what else you do, always give 100 percent effort. You have to do that in the games AND in practice. You’re not going to take plays off during a game, so don’t do it in practice either. You have to practice like you play. Leave it all on the field and you‘ll never go wrong.”

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Zane Quesenberry

Over the years, Pulaski County has had some remarkable players in it’s defensive secondary. Andre Eaves, Steve Alley, Rodney Landreth and Alan Wheeling to name only a few in the history of the Cougar Football program. A new name may soon be added to that list, however, as a current member of the Cougar team is working his way towards that goal.
Zane Quesenberry, a 5-11, 167-pound, 17-year-old senior safety for Pulaski County, has become both an impact player and a leader for this Cougar squad. In his second year as a starter in the Pulaski secondary, there aren’t too many things that get past him.
In his junior season, Zane was selected as an All-River Ridge District second team safety. He recorded 95 tackles, and led the team in interceptions with his three picks, while also defending several other pass attempts. In the off season, he set his goals and got to work getting bigger, faster and stronger. Quesenberry finished up the off season weight lifting program with a 235-pound bench press max, a 365-pound squat max, and a 235-pound power clean max. After a very productive summer 7-on-7 Camp, Zane went to work with his teammates, and has become a key part of the newly invigorated “Gold Swarm” Cougar defense.
To this point in the season (prior to the Cave Spring game), Zane has recorded 40 tackles, 7 pass deflections, and 6 interceptions. The single season record for interceptions is 8, and that honor is shared by former Cougar standouts Alley (1987), Eaves (1992), and Wheeling (2000). With four regular season games to go, the sure-handed safety needs only two more interceptions to tie that record. Quesenberry also recorded 2 interceptions in his sophomore season, putting his career total at 11. The career interception record stands at 13, and is currently held by current Cougar coaches Landreth (1984-85) and Eaves (1991-94). Should Quesenberry get the two interceptions he needs to tie the single season record, he will also tie the career record.
To talk with Quesenberry, you would never suspect this calm, mild-mannered young man possesses the aggressiveness to put up these kinds of numbers. A quiet, “yes sir, no sir” type of young man, he quietly goes about doing his job both on the field and in the classroom, where he holds a 3.4 GPA. While he certainly is making his mark in football, he is also a solid contributor for the Cougar basketball team and baseball team.
“Zane is the type of kid a coach loves to have on his team,” said Head Coach Jack Turner. “He comes in, he works his tail off for you, he does well in his classes, and he’s very positive. He’s a very intelligent young man, and he picks up on things very quickly when we study our opponents on film. On the field, he is the type of player that will come in and knock somebody for a loop, then help them up and go back to the huddle to get ready for the next play. With his attitude and work habits, he‘s going to make a fine college student, and a fine college athlete.”
While Quesnberry, like most every player on this season’s team, hopes that his best memory of Cougar football is still yet to come, he does have one very special memory that he shared. “My tenth grade year we beat Jefferson Forest in a very tight game the week after “Coach D” (Kenneth J. Dobson) passed away. We were having a pretty rough season, and that was our first win. After the game, I remember everybody was crying and laughing, and we all just kept talking about Ben (Buckland) and how he had kicked the big field goals and how proud ‘Coach D’ would have been. The way we came together as a team and as community was really something I’ll never forget.” Quesenberry recalled.

While Quesenberry is certainly focused on the season right now, he is also looking ahead to his future. “I’m really hoping to go to Elon University. I like the school and what they have to offer, but if that doesn’t work out there are some others I’m interested in as well. My grades are pretty good and I’m involved in a good number of extra curricular activities that colleges like, so I’m hoping for the best.”
When asked what advice he would give to the upcoming rec league and middle school athletes who hope to one day take his spot, Zane was very clear. “No matter what else you do, always give 100 percent effort. You have to do that in the games AND in practice. You’re not going to take plays off during a game, so don’t do it in practice either. You have to practice like you play. Leave it all on the field and you‘ll never go wrong.”

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