Duncan Suzuki

Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Business up at Goodwill, Daily Bread

Sales at district Goodwill stores are up five percent over last year, but not necessarily because of the declining economy, according to the stores’ vice president of marketing and development.
Jim Shaver said the thrift store’s fiscal year begins July 1, so it is hard to estimate how overall sales for the present year will compare with last year. Sales topped $22 million in the 2007 fiscal year and $20 million a year earlier.
At this point, he said, “there are no signs people are coming (to the second-hand clothing store) to save money.”
Pulaski County has two Goodwill stores: one in Pulaski Shopping Center on East Main Street, and the other one is behind Sheetz in Fairlawn.
Although foot traffic is up, Shaver and district manager Mindy Boyd said they have to closely watch their level of donations.
Boyd explained that even though the number of donors has increased, donations per person have actually decreased.
Boyd explained that people are now keeping items they might have donated prior to the economic downfall.
In an effort to beef up donations, Shaver said Goodwill has started a program with Dell Computers. Under the program unused computers may be brought into Goodwill stores for recycling. The hope is that people will bring other items with them when they bring the computers.
Perhaps September sales will be an indication of how annual sales will tally.
Boyd said, “we did really well (this September) compared to last year.”
September is usually a “lull period” for the stores because back-to-school rush is over and the October Halloween sales haven’t kicked in yet.
Boyd said October is the best sales month for Goodwill because people like to shop for clothing they can use to make Halloween costumes.
Gail Mabry, a regular customer at the Pulaski store, said she stops in several times a day because new items are always being added to the inventory.
She said the selection is always clean, the employees are always friendly and “you can find about anything you want. The very thing you think you can’t find is there on the shelf.”
Mabry, who is retired, said she is trying to pay off her credit card bills so she will spend her money at Goodwill before she will other stores.
Shaver said Goodwill is satisfied with its sales, but is always striving for growth.
Goodwill has 27 retail stores and 71 donation centers, so if inventory gets low at one store, products can be moved from another location.
Pulaski Daily Bread is reporting an increase in people eating there, with a lot being “new faces.” Daily Bread is a charitable ministry of First Presbyterian Church, offering free meals without questioning need.
The head of the Daily Bread program was unable to comment further due to being short-handed Friday afternoon and Monday morning.
Kathy Denny of The BLDG, a downtown Pulaski Mission that runs a thrift store, could not be reached for comment on business there.

Business up at Goodwill, Daily Bread

Sales at district Goodwill stores are up five percent over last year, but not necessarily because of the declining economy, according to the stores’ vice president of marketing and development.
Jim Shaver said the thrift store’s fiscal year begins July 1, so it is hard to estimate how overall sales for the present year will compare with last year. Sales topped $22 million in the 2007 fiscal year and $20 million a year earlier.
At this point, he said, “there are no signs people are coming (to the second-hand clothing store) to save money.”
Pulaski County has two Goodwill stores: one in Pulaski Shopping Center on East Main Street, and the other one is behind Sheetz in Fairlawn.
Although foot traffic is up, Shaver and district manager Mindy Boyd said they have to closely watch their level of donations.
Boyd explained that even though the number of donors has increased, donations per person have actually decreased.
Boyd explained that people are now keeping items they might have donated prior to the economic downfall.
In an effort to beef up donations, Shaver said Goodwill has started a program with Dell Computers. Under the program unused computers may be brought into Goodwill stores for recycling. The hope is that people will bring other items with them when they bring the computers.
Perhaps September sales will be an indication of how annual sales will tally.
Boyd said, “we did really well (this September) compared to last year.”
September is usually a “lull period” for the stores because back-to-school rush is over and the October Halloween sales haven’t kicked in yet.
Boyd said October is the best sales month for Goodwill because people like to shop for clothing they can use to make Halloween costumes.
Gail Mabry, a regular customer at the Pulaski store, said she stops in several times a day because new items are always being added to the inventory.
She said the selection is always clean, the employees are always friendly and “you can find about anything you want. The very thing you think you can’t find is there on the shelf.”
Mabry, who is retired, said she is trying to pay off her credit card bills so she will spend her money at Goodwill before she will other stores.
Shaver said Goodwill is satisfied with its sales, but is always striving for growth.
Goodwill has 27 retail stores and 71 donation centers, so if inventory gets low at one store, products can be moved from another location.
Pulaski Daily Bread is reporting an increase in people eating there, with a lot being “new faces.” Daily Bread is a charitable ministry of First Presbyterian Church, offering free meals without questioning need.
The head of the Daily Bread program was unable to comment further due to being short-handed Friday afternoon and Monday morning.
Kathy Denny of The BLDG, a downtown Pulaski Mission that runs a thrift store, could not be reached for comment on business there.