Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Dublin infant recovering from ‘rare’ serious illness

He’s only eight months old, but Malakhi Burton has already been through more in his short life, than some people endure in a lifetime.
At his young age, Malakhi has had to endure a dangerous and rare illness, undergone surgery and had to be resuscitated when his small heart stopped beating after surgery.
The ordeal started a couple of weeks ago when what at first appeared to be a bad case of gas and constipation escalated to the point Malakhi ended up in critical condition in Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital’s pediatric intensive care unit.
But the situation could have been much worse if not for the experiences of a woman working at Pulaski Community Hospital, who recognized the symptoms of the rare condition that had afflicted Malakhi, according to his father, Milton Boysaw of Dublin.
Boysaw said he first noticed there was a problem when Malakhi started “cramping over” and regurgitating every time he was fed. He took the child to the PCH emergency room, where the doctors working that night gave him some drops to give Malakhi for gas and sent them back home.
Boysaw kept Malakhi in bed with him that night, noticing the child “tossing and turning” all night.
It wasn’t until the next morning that he noticed Malakhi’s condition had deteriorated overnight.
“His lips were purple and his eyes were rolled back in his head,” Boysaw said, noting that he could pass his hand in front of the tot’s face and Malakhi wouldn’t notice. He rushed the infant back to PCH’s emergency room.
But this time, it was clear gas wasn’t the problem.
Boysaw said a woman working in the emergency room that morning immediately recognized the infant’s problem, intussusception, because it is a prominent illness in children in her native country. He said she was either from Iran or India, but he couldn’t recall which.
Nonetheless, he added, “if not for her (Malakhi) would have died.”
He said he learned Malakhi had gone into shock during the night.
Physicians called for Lifeguard 10 emergency medical helicopter to transport Malakhi to Roanoke, but it wasn’t available so he had to be transported by ambulance.
While en route, Boysaw said he heard someone tell the Roanoke hospital to be ready because they were bringing in a critical child.
Intussusception is a situation where a portion of the bowel slides into another section, like one piece of a telescope slides into the next, according to KidsHealth.com. This situation causes a bowl obstruction, which leads to swelling and decreases blood flow to the section of the intestines involved.
Intussusception affects only about one to four out of 1,000 infants and is three to four times more common in boys than in girls. Its cause is unknown, but is believed to be linked to a virus.
According to Boysaw, doctors at RMH indicated they had only seen the illness in three other children over the years.
In an effort to avoid surgery, he said the Roanoke doctors tried to give Malakhi some barium to see if the problem would correct itself. However, when it became obvious that wasn’t going to work, Malakhi had to be taken to surgery.
A little more than three hours later, doctors emerged from the operating room and told Boysaw the surgery went well.
A relieved Boysaw went to be with his son in the pediatric trauma unit. Later that night he went into a nearby lounge to get some rest.
Unfortunately, the father’s relief was short-lived.
During the night, Malakhi started having seizures from having been in shock so long (estimated at seven to eight hours) prior to the surgery.
Malakhi’s heart stopped beating.
“Two doctors worked on him for four hours to save his life,” Boysaw said. They had to induce a coma as part of their life-saving efforts.
From that point on, it was touch and go for most of the next week. It wasn’t until the Thursday after Malakhi’s Saturday surgery that doctors became confident of the child’s survival.
Boysaw said doctors indicated it was the first time they had had a child go into cardiac arrest following surgery for intussusception. Normally, he said, children recover quickly and are able to go home within a few days.
“The doctors said the average adult wouldn’t have survived (what Malakhi had gone through),” Boysaw said.
But Malakhi is now on his way to recovery. Boysaw said doctors indicated it will be a slow process for the child to recover all functions, but they feel confident he will get well.
The bad news is, intussusception can re-occur, Boysaw said.
Boysaw is employed by Virginia Department of Transportation. He said his fellow employees sent money to help while he is off work. They also donated sick leave and vacation to cover Boysaw’s leave.
“They’ve been real good to me,” he added.

Comments

comments

Dublin infant recovering from ‘rare’ serious illness

He’s only eight months old, but Malakhi Burton has already been through more in his short life, than some people endure in a lifetime.
At his young age, Malakhi has had to endure a dangerous and rare illness, undergone surgery and had to be resuscitated when his small heart stopped beating after surgery.
The ordeal started a couple of weeks ago when what at first appeared to be a bad case of gas and constipation escalated to the point Malakhi ended up in critical condition in Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital’s pediatric intensive care unit.
But the situation could have been much worse if not for the experiences of a woman working at Pulaski Community Hospital, who recognized the symptoms of the rare condition that had afflicted Malakhi, according to his father, Milton Boysaw of Dublin.
Boysaw said he first noticed there was a problem when Malakhi started “cramping over” and regurgitating every time he was fed. He took the child to the PCH emergency room, where the doctors working that night gave him some drops to give Malakhi for gas and sent them back home.
Boysaw kept Malakhi in bed with him that night, noticing the child “tossing and turning” all night.
It wasn’t until the next morning that he noticed Malakhi’s condition had deteriorated overnight.
“His lips were purple and his eyes were rolled back in his head,” Boysaw said, noting that he could pass his hand in front of the tot’s face and Malakhi wouldn’t notice. He rushed the infant back to PCH’s emergency room.
But this time, it was clear gas wasn’t the problem.
Boysaw said a woman working in the emergency room that morning immediately recognized the infant’s problem, intussusception, because it is a prominent illness in children in her native country. He said she was either from Iran or India, but he couldn’t recall which.
Nonetheless, he added, “if not for her (Malakhi) would have died.”
He said he learned Malakhi had gone into shock during the night.
Physicians called for Lifeguard 10 emergency medical helicopter to transport Malakhi to Roanoke, but it wasn’t available so he had to be transported by ambulance.
While en route, Boysaw said he heard someone tell the Roanoke hospital to be ready because they were bringing in a critical child.
Intussusception is a situation where a portion of the bowel slides into another section, like one piece of a telescope slides into the next, according to KidsHealth.com. This situation causes a bowl obstruction, which leads to swelling and decreases blood flow to the section of the intestines involved.
Intussusception affects only about one to four out of 1,000 infants and is three to four times more common in boys than in girls. Its cause is unknown, but is believed to be linked to a virus.
According to Boysaw, doctors at RMH indicated they had only seen the illness in three other children over the years.
In an effort to avoid surgery, he said the Roanoke doctors tried to give Malakhi some barium to see if the problem would correct itself. However, when it became obvious that wasn’t going to work, Malakhi had to be taken to surgery.
A little more than three hours later, doctors emerged from the operating room and told Boysaw the surgery went well.
A relieved Boysaw went to be with his son in the pediatric trauma unit. Later that night he went into a nearby lounge to get some rest.
Unfortunately, the father’s relief was short-lived.
During the night, Malakhi started having seizures from having been in shock so long (estimated at seven to eight hours) prior to the surgery.
Malakhi’s heart stopped beating.
“Two doctors worked on him for four hours to save his life,” Boysaw said. They had to induce a coma as part of their life-saving efforts.
From that point on, it was touch and go for most of the next week. It wasn’t until the Thursday after Malakhi’s Saturday surgery that doctors became confident of the child’s survival.
Boysaw said doctors indicated it was the first time they had had a child go into cardiac arrest following surgery for intussusception. Normally, he said, children recover quickly and are able to go home within a few days.
“The doctors said the average adult wouldn’t have survived (what Malakhi had gone through),” Boysaw said.
But Malakhi is now on his way to recovery. Boysaw said doctors indicated it will be a slow process for the child to recover all functions, but they feel confident he will get well.
The bad news is, intussusception can re-occur, Boysaw said.
Boysaw is employed by Virginia Department of Transportation. He said his fellow employees sent money to help while he is off work. They also donated sick leave and vacation to cover Boysaw’s leave.
“They’ve been real good to me,” he added.

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login