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Residents did their part during WWII

The story of Pulaski County during World II continues today.
During World War II, The Southwest Times carried stories about a successful scrap drive, bond sales and the draft board’s heavy work, along with headlines such as, “Hundreds of citizens enlist” and “Plants speed up production.”
There were also stories about individual women and men, along with many pictures.
For a year, sweethearts, wives, husbands and children had stood at bus and train stations expressing often teary good-byes.
More than a thousand Pulaski Countians had answered the nations call to arms in that first year, and sad messages reporting war casualties were already coming in.
The Southwest Times listed the names of every person who had become a member of the armed forces during the year and published many pictures.
Pulaski Veneer and Furniture Corp. reported a year after Pearl Harbor that a sizable part of the company’s plant had been converted to the manufacture of war materials.
These included aircraft parts, aircraft veneer, rifle stocks, and boat timbers.
Carefully selected and precision sawed walnut wood from this plant went into making many thousands of rifle stocks.
J. C. Dobson reported that county citizens collected more than five million pounds of scrap metal, and a county-wide rubber drive brought in a half million pounds in a period of thirty days.
Dobson was the owner and operator of Dobson Hosiery Mills and was also a big booster of bond sales.
One year after Pearl Harbor, Pulaskians looked back and reviewed the changes that a year of war had wrought.
On Dec. 12, 1942, The Southwest Times put out a special edition titled, “Pulaski recalls first year of World War II.”
A little block on the upper left-hand corner of the front page pictured the American flag and the words, “Remember Pearl Harbor,” and a Minuteman with the message, “For freedom’s sake, buy War Bonds.”
A further study of the paper indicates that Pulaski County citizens were busy doing both and much more.

The paper contained a thorough report of what was and what happened to Pulaski and Pulaskians in the year since the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.
Local theaters were called upon to assist in publicizing the sale of war bonds and issuing the same.

They were responsible for the successful sale of thousands of these bonds during the first year of the war.
The local draft board did a remarkable job of supplying quotas of men and women to various branches of service and in determining hardship cases where deferments might be necessary.
Perhaps the toughest job of all was that of the rationing board.
These were the people who decided how much gasoline and other scarce items.
The chief rationed products were gas and tires, and many cars and trucks were forced to sit idle much of the time.
Sugar was rationed, but it seemed that the only people who really missed that item were the bootleggers because it takes a lot of sugar to turn out a batch of moonshine.
Lloyd Mathews of Pulaski is a retired land surveyor and local historian.

Residents did their part during WWII

The story of Pulaski County during World II continues today.
During World War II, The Southwest Times carried stories about a successful scrap drive, bond sales and the draft board’s heavy work, along with headlines such as, “Hundreds of citizens enlist” and “Plants speed up production.”
There were also stories about individual women and men, along with many pictures.
For a year, sweethearts, wives, husbands and children had stood at bus and train stations expressing often teary good-byes.
More than a thousand Pulaski Countians had answered the nations call to arms in that first year, and sad messages reporting war casualties were already coming in.
The Southwest Times listed the names of every person who had become a member of the armed forces during the year and published many pictures.
Pulaski Veneer and Furniture Corp. reported a year after Pearl Harbor that a sizable part of the company’s plant had been converted to the manufacture of war materials.
These included aircraft parts, aircraft veneer, rifle stocks, and boat timbers.
Carefully selected and precision sawed walnut wood from this plant went into making many thousands of rifle stocks.
J. C. Dobson reported that county citizens collected more than five million pounds of scrap metal, and a county-wide rubber drive brought in a half million pounds in a period of thirty days.
Dobson was the owner and operator of Dobson Hosiery Mills and was also a big booster of bond sales.
One year after Pearl Harbor, Pulaskians looked back and reviewed the changes that a year of war had wrought.
On Dec. 12, 1942, The Southwest Times put out a special edition titled, “Pulaski recalls first year of World War II.”
A little block on the upper left-hand corner of the front page pictured the American flag and the words, “Remember Pearl Harbor,” and a Minuteman with the message, “For freedom’s sake, buy War Bonds.”
A further study of the paper indicates that Pulaski County citizens were busy doing both and much more.

The paper contained a thorough report of what was and what happened to Pulaski and Pulaskians in the year since the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.
Local theaters were called upon to assist in publicizing the sale of war bonds and issuing the same.

They were responsible for the successful sale of thousands of these bonds during the first year of the war.
The local draft board did a remarkable job of supplying quotas of men and women to various branches of service and in determining hardship cases where deferments might be necessary.
Perhaps the toughest job of all was that of the rationing board.
These were the people who decided how much gasoline and other scarce items.
The chief rationed products were gas and tires, and many cars and trucks were forced to sit idle much of the time.
Sugar was rationed, but it seemed that the only people who really missed that item were the bootleggers because it takes a lot of sugar to turn out a batch of moonshine.
Lloyd Mathews of Pulaski is a retired land surveyor and local historian.