Duncan Suzuki

Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Community meeting set Oct. 14

The Town of Pulaski’s Economic Development Committee will hold a community meeting in October to discuss a grant that will help assess the town’s brownfields.
Brownfields are commercial facilities or properties with redevelopment potential that also have either real or perceived environmental contaminants.
The grant, through the Environmental Protection Agency, will help fund assessment of properties to determine whether they meet the classification of a brownfield.
The community meeting will be held Oct. 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the council chambers on the second floor of the Pulaski Municipal Building on First Street. The public is encouraged to attend and ask questions following a brief overview of the grant.
The group hopes to submit the grant application by Nov. 1. There is no guarantee the town will be approved for the program, but Lori Kroll said Wednesday she has stopped saying “if we get the money” and has started saying “when we get the money” instead.
Kroll is a community resource specialist with Draper Aden Associates in Blacksburg, which is assisting with development of the grant proposal.
Kroll asked committee members to contact area community organizations and ask for their support of the initiative.
She said it would be great if the organizations would offer time or money for the project, but she would like for them to provide a letter of support at a minimum.
The letters will be submitted to DEQ along with the grant proposal application.
Kroll also pointed out that it is imperative that owners of the prospective properties be willing to cooperate with the assessments if the town is to be approved for grant money. She also noted that if contamination is found and the current property owners are found to be responsible, the site would be disqualified from any future clean-up funds.
Nonetheless, she said other state funds should be available for cleanup in that event.
Economic Development Director John White said he believes the property owners will be cooperative, especially since it will make the properties easier to market for sale.
“We essentially see this program as a testing program to put properties back into the real estate market so they’re not sitting there idle,” he said.
Some of the potential sites that could be evaluated under the grant include: the former Pulaski Foundry and Machine Co. (General Chemical) property north of First Street N.E.; Allied Chemical properties off East Main Street; the Pulaski/Coleman Furniture site; and the former Virginia Maid Hosiery site.
You may contact Melinda Williams at melinda@southwesttimes.com

Community meeting set Oct. 14

The Town of Pulaski’s Economic Development Committee will hold a community meeting in October to discuss a grant that will help assess the town’s brownfields.
Brownfields are commercial facilities or properties with redevelopment potential that also have either real or perceived environmental contaminants.
The grant, through the Environmental Protection Agency, will help fund assessment of properties to determine whether they meet the classification of a brownfield.
The community meeting will be held Oct. 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the council chambers on the second floor of the Pulaski Municipal Building on First Street. The public is encouraged to attend and ask questions following a brief overview of the grant.
The group hopes to submit the grant application by Nov. 1. There is no guarantee the town will be approved for the program, but Lori Kroll said Wednesday she has stopped saying “if we get the money” and has started saying “when we get the money” instead.
Kroll is a community resource specialist with Draper Aden Associates in Blacksburg, which is assisting with development of the grant proposal.
Kroll asked committee members to contact area community organizations and ask for their support of the initiative.
She said it would be great if the organizations would offer time or money for the project, but she would like for them to provide a letter of support at a minimum.
The letters will be submitted to DEQ along with the grant proposal application.
Kroll also pointed out that it is imperative that owners of the prospective properties be willing to cooperate with the assessments if the town is to be approved for grant money. She also noted that if contamination is found and the current property owners are found to be responsible, the site would be disqualified from any future clean-up funds.
Nonetheless, she said other state funds should be available for cleanup in that event.
Economic Development Director John White said he believes the property owners will be cooperative, especially since it will make the properties easier to market for sale.
“We essentially see this program as a testing program to put properties back into the real estate market so they’re not sitting there idle,” he said.
Some of the potential sites that could be evaluated under the grant include: the former Pulaski Foundry and Machine Co. (General Chemical) property north of First Street N.E.; Allied Chemical properties off East Main Street; the Pulaski/Coleman Furniture site; and the former Virginia Maid Hosiery site.
You may contact Melinda Williams at melinda@southwesttimes.com