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Patriot Day marks 9/11 anniversary

On Sept. 11, 2001, nearly 3,000 people lost their lives as a result of terrorist attacks on the United States.
Now, seven years later, the nation still looks back in remembrance to those lost during the tragic events of that day on what is now known as “Patriot Day.”
Patriot Day was designated as a discretionary day of remembrance after President Bush signed U.S. House of Representatives Joint Resolution 71 into law on Dec. 18, 2001. The resolution had been approved by the House with a vote of 470-0 on Oct. 25, 2001.
The day was initially called the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance for the Victims of the Terrorist Attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, but was shortened to Patriot Day in 2002 by President Bush.
The president directs that on Patriot Day, the American flag be flown at half-staff and displayed from individual American homes, at the White House, and on all U.S. government buildings and establishments, at home and abroad, and also asks that Americans observe a moment of silence beginning at 8:46 A.M. (Eastern Daylight Time) marking the time of first plane crash on Sept. 11, 2001.
Locally, members of the community have chosen additional ways to observe Patriot Day.
For example, earlier this week, Dublin Christian Church hosted an observance event, which included a message presented by minister Terry Hodge, along with special singing. A special invitation to the event was extended to local first responders.
Today at Bisset Park in Radford, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., members of area law enforcement agencies, fire departments and EMS crews will be recognized at a “First Responders Appreciation Day” event. All agency representatives in uniform or with a badge will be served a catered lunch, and the heads of each department will be awarded plaques recognizing the work each organization does on a daily basis to protect the people of this region.
In addition, today at noon, an interdenominational prayer gathering was scheduled to be held on the lawn in front of the Pulaski County Courthouse. Organizers said the gathering was a time for all Christians to unite in prayer for the town, county, state and nation.
Some local schools are also participating in observances for Patriot Day. For example, Janis Carter, principal of Snowville Elementary School, said her students would gather around the school’s flag pole for a small ceremony to include the reciting of the Pledge of Allegiance, the reading of a poem and an explanation of the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001.
You may contact Jena Hardy at jena@southwesttimes.com

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Patriot Day marks 9/11 anniversary

On Sept. 11, 2001, nearly 3,000 people lost their lives as a result of terrorist attacks on the United States.
Now, seven years later, the nation still looks back in remembrance to those lost during the tragic events of that day on what is now known as “Patriot Day.”
Patriot Day was designated as a discretionary day of remembrance after President Bush signed U.S. House of Representatives Joint Resolution 71 into law on Dec. 18, 2001. The resolution had been approved by the House with a vote of 470-0 on Oct. 25, 2001.
The day was initially called the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance for the Victims of the Terrorist Attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, but was shortened to Patriot Day in 2002 by President Bush.
The president directs that on Patriot Day, the American flag be flown at half-staff and displayed from individual American homes, at the White House, and on all U.S. government buildings and establishments, at home and abroad, and also asks that Americans observe a moment of silence beginning at 8:46 A.M. (Eastern Daylight Time) marking the time of first plane crash on Sept. 11, 2001.
Locally, members of the community have chosen additional ways to observe Patriot Day.
For example, earlier this week, Dublin Christian Church hosted an observance event, which included a message presented by minister Terry Hodge, along with special singing. A special invitation to the event was extended to local first responders.
Today at Bisset Park in Radford, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., members of area law enforcement agencies, fire departments and EMS crews will be recognized at a “First Responders Appreciation Day” event. All agency representatives in uniform or with a badge will be served a catered lunch, and the heads of each department will be awarded plaques recognizing the work each organization does on a daily basis to protect the people of this region.
In addition, today at noon, an interdenominational prayer gathering was scheduled to be held on the lawn in front of the Pulaski County Courthouse. Organizers said the gathering was a time for all Christians to unite in prayer for the town, county, state and nation.
Some local schools are also participating in observances for Patriot Day. For example, Janis Carter, principal of Snowville Elementary School, said her students would gather around the school’s flag pole for a small ceremony to include the reciting of the Pledge of Allegiance, the reading of a poem and an explanation of the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001.
You may contact Jena Hardy at jena@southwesttimes.com

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