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Sheriff’s Office putting old cell phones to good use

Think twice before throwing that old cell phone in the trash because it could be a lifesaver for someone else.
According to Pulaski County Sheriff Jim Davis, what may be useless to one person may end up being another person’s only link to law enforcement in a dangerous situation.
“It’s a great program,” said Davis. He was speaking of a program the department has “done on a smaller scale in the past,” but has decided to “branch out.”
The sheriff’s department is looking to the public for help in its effort to collect cell phones, and their related accessories, to loan to people involved in situations of domestic violence or other violent relationships. The phones provide a victim with the ability to call police if they find themselves in a situation where they may be in danger from their potential attacker.
Davis said the program benefits everyone because victims have an extra tool for security and the cell phones stay out of the landfill and get put to use for public safety.
He points out that the phones cannot be used to call any number other than 911 because there are no service plans attached to them.
However, the phones provide security because all cell phones are required by law to operate, with or without service plans, when 911 is dialed. Of course, the battery has to be charged and a signal must be available.
Anyone having a cell phone to donate to the cause is asked to drop it by the sheriff’s office on East Main Street (near the Madison Avenue intersection) or turn it over to any deputy.
Davis asks that any related accessories, such as chargers and batteries, be provided as well. However, the cell phones will be accepted without accessories. “We greatly appreciate any (phones) we can get.”
Once phones are received, the sheriff’s office sends them to a company that has agreed to refurbish them. The phones are then loaned to people the department deems to be in need of one.
“Our concern is public safety … if we see there is a great need, we won’t turn anyone down,” he added.
Call the sheriff’s office or Pulaski Police Department to apply for one of the emergency phones. “We’ll be glad to meet with them and determine if we need to furnish them a phone,” the sheriff said.
Although the phones are not limited to domestic violence situations, Davis estimated police receive from two to 12 domestic calls per 12-hour shift.
You may contact Melinda Williams at melinda@southwesttimes.com

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Sheriff’s Office putting old cell phones to good use

Think twice before throwing that old cell phone in the trash because it could be a lifesaver for someone else.
According to Pulaski County Sheriff Jim Davis, what may be useless to one person may end up being another person’s only link to law enforcement in a dangerous situation.
“It’s a great program,” said Davis. He was speaking of a program the department has “done on a smaller scale in the past,” but has decided to “branch out.”
The sheriff’s department is looking to the public for help in its effort to collect cell phones, and their related accessories, to loan to people involved in situations of domestic violence or other violent relationships. The phones provide a victim with the ability to call police if they find themselves in a situation where they may be in danger from their potential attacker.
Davis said the program benefits everyone because victims have an extra tool for security and the cell phones stay out of the landfill and get put to use for public safety.
He points out that the phones cannot be used to call any number other than 911 because there are no service plans attached to them.
However, the phones provide security because all cell phones are required by law to operate, with or without service plans, when 911 is dialed. Of course, the battery has to be charged and a signal must be available.
Anyone having a cell phone to donate to the cause is asked to drop it by the sheriff’s office on East Main Street (near the Madison Avenue intersection) or turn it over to any deputy.
Davis asks that any related accessories, such as chargers and batteries, be provided as well. However, the cell phones will be accepted without accessories. “We greatly appreciate any (phones) we can get.”
Once phones are received, the sheriff’s office sends them to a company that has agreed to refurbish them. The phones are then loaned to people the department deems to be in need of one.
“Our concern is public safety … if we see there is a great need, we won’t turn anyone down,” he added.
Call the sheriff’s office or Pulaski Police Department to apply for one of the emergency phones. “We’ll be glad to meet with them and determine if we need to furnish them a phone,” the sheriff said.
Although the phones are not limited to domestic violence situations, Davis estimated police receive from two to 12 domestic calls per 12-hour shift.
You may contact Melinda Williams at melinda@southwesttimes.com

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