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Remembering the world war

With the war hopefully winding down in Iraq, and the various political candidates talking about bringing the troops home, I’m sure that many veterans of past wars think back to the wars that they remember. I wasn’t around for World War I, but I came along soon enough after that one to hear plenty about it. For the next few weeks while the politicians are at war, I will try to write about the world war.
World War I ended Nov. 11,1918. For many years after that date, the United States celebrated Nov. 11 as a legal holiday, and it was called Armistice Day. In recent years the name of the holiday which falls on the same day has been recognized as Veterans Day. It is still celebrated with various programs of a military nature being shown on television, by means of radio and through local parades.
Pulaski County had 1,400 men serving in one branch of service or another in the first world war, mostly in France, Germany and in the United States, and a number of these earned military honors, such as citations and medals for bravery in battle.
Stories of heroic acts of some of these are told, along with those of conflicts of other dates. This county seems to have never lacked men and women who were willing to serve faithfully and bravely for the United States.
To name all of the heroes would require many books, but all who served honorably, whether decorated or not , earned, or are earning, a special place in the hearts of their families and of special friends and fellow citizens.
They deserve what they get, and there are few who would not say he or she would do it again if need be.
Very little history has been written about Pulaski County’s acceptance of World War I or on what went on in the county to aid in the war effort. In his book titled “The Land That is Pulaski County,” Conway Smith tells about Company L , an Army company composed of mostly Pulaski men entering a request to higher authorities that would bring about the calling up of the company and sending it to France to fight. The request was denied.
The company had done duty on the border of Texas during the trouble with Mexico. Officers of Company L did help train men in the states for combat duty in France.
Among them were lieutenants James G. Bosang, John and W. N. Showalter, and Sgt. Temple Painter. None of these went out of the country.
The company in 1917 did guard duty on the Clifton Forge Division of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.
As for Pulaski citizens’ attitudes concerning World War I, they wholeheartedly supported the war effort against Germany by subscribing to Liberty Bonds.
A story is told concerning citizens of the Little Walker’s Creek section of the county, that people in that area, even though they had heard a lot about airplanes being used in the war, had probably never actually seen one in that early time.
Finally a citizen did see one fly over and is reported to made a bee line up the creek, telling everyone that the Germans were flying in to bomb the Buckeye Lumber Company’s saw mill.
It is likely that if the enemy had undertaken to make such an attack, he would have been after bigger game.
Lloyd Mathews of Pulaski is a retired land surveyor and local historian.

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Remembering the world war

With the war hopefully winding down in Iraq, and the various political candidates talking about bringing the troops home, I’m sure that many veterans of past wars think back to the wars that they remember. I wasn’t around for World War I, but I came along soon enough after that one to hear plenty about it. For the next few weeks while the politicians are at war, I will try to write about the world war.
World War I ended Nov. 11,1918. For many years after that date, the United States celebrated Nov. 11 as a legal holiday, and it was called Armistice Day. In recent years the name of the holiday which falls on the same day has been recognized as Veterans Day. It is still celebrated with various programs of a military nature being shown on television, by means of radio and through local parades.
Pulaski County had 1,400 men serving in one branch of service or another in the first world war, mostly in France, Germany and in the United States, and a number of these earned military honors, such as citations and medals for bravery in battle.
Stories of heroic acts of some of these are told, along with those of conflicts of other dates. This county seems to have never lacked men and women who were willing to serve faithfully and bravely for the United States.
To name all of the heroes would require many books, but all who served honorably, whether decorated or not , earned, or are earning, a special place in the hearts of their families and of special friends and fellow citizens.
They deserve what they get, and there are few who would not say he or she would do it again if need be.
Very little history has been written about Pulaski County’s acceptance of World War I or on what went on in the county to aid in the war effort. In his book titled “The Land That is Pulaski County,” Conway Smith tells about Company L , an Army company composed of mostly Pulaski men entering a request to higher authorities that would bring about the calling up of the company and sending it to France to fight. The request was denied.
The company had done duty on the border of Texas during the trouble with Mexico. Officers of Company L did help train men in the states for combat duty in France.
Among them were lieutenants James G. Bosang, John and W. N. Showalter, and Sgt. Temple Painter. None of these went out of the country.
The company in 1917 did guard duty on the Clifton Forge Division of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.
As for Pulaski citizens’ attitudes concerning World War I, they wholeheartedly supported the war effort against Germany by subscribing to Liberty Bonds.
A story is told concerning citizens of the Little Walker’s Creek section of the county, that people in that area, even though they had heard a lot about airplanes being used in the war, had probably never actually seen one in that early time.
Finally a citizen did see one fly over and is reported to made a bee line up the creek, telling everyone that the Germans were flying in to bomb the Buckeye Lumber Company’s saw mill.
It is likely that if the enemy had undertaken to make such an attack, he would have been after bigger game.
Lloyd Mathews of Pulaski is a retired land surveyor and local historian.

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