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Schools meet goals

By JENA HARDY
Staff Writer

The Pulaski County Public School division met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals for the first time this year.
“This is good news. We are very, very proud,” said Glenda Patton, coordinator of testing and special projects for PCPS, as she presented this information to the Pulaski County School Board at its most recent meeting.
AYP is a calculation made yearly based on the No Child Left Behind federal legislation. In these calculations, schools are required to make increasing benchmarks set forth by NCLB in all of several subgroups as well as by the entire school population in grades three through 12.
Patton explained that to determine the status of PCPS for the 2008-09 school year, the benchmarks for the testing completed in the spring of 2008 were 77 percent for reading and language arts and 75 percent for mathematics.
In addition to these testing benchmarks, the school system was required to choose one other academic indicator. Pulaski County’s choice was graduation and attendance rate, Patton said.
While as a school division, PCPS met AYP goals, not every school met individual AYP goals. Seven out of the nine schools in the county, including Pulaski County High School, both Pulaski and Dublin Middle School, Critzer Elementary, Snowville Elementary, Newbern Elementary and Riverlawn Elementary met AYP goals. However, Dublin Elementary and Pulaski Elementary did not.
Despite that fact, this is still an improvement from the 2006-07 school year, Patton said.
Last year, only five of Pulaski County’s nine schools reached AYP goals (PES, DES, PMS and DMS did not make AYP last year), and as a school division, PCPS did not meet those goals overall.
In addition, while DES and PES did not make AYP this year, they improved from two areas of sanction to one, meaning that instead of not meeting the benchmarks in both reading/language arts and math, they met at least one of those benchmarks this year, which is an improvement, Patton said.
“While it’s not 100 percent, it’s definitely improvement across the board,” Patton said.
In addition, only one of the subgroups — which includes all, white, black, Hispanic, limited English proficiency, disadvantaged and disabled students — was cited as an area in need of improvement, and that was the disadvantaged subgroup. Patton noted students could fit into more than one subgroup.
“Our area of greatest need right now is our disadvantaged students,” Patton said.
You may contact Jena Hardy at jena@southwesttimes.com

Schools meet goals

By JENA HARDY
Staff Writer

The Pulaski County Public School division met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals for the first time this year.
“This is good news. We are very, very proud,” said Glenda Patton, coordinator of testing and special projects for PCPS, as she presented this information to the Pulaski County School Board at its most recent meeting.
AYP is a calculation made yearly based on the No Child Left Behind federal legislation. In these calculations, schools are required to make increasing benchmarks set forth by NCLB in all of several subgroups as well as by the entire school population in grades three through 12.
Patton explained that to determine the status of PCPS for the 2008-09 school year, the benchmarks for the testing completed in the spring of 2008 were 77 percent for reading and language arts and 75 percent for mathematics.
In addition to these testing benchmarks, the school system was required to choose one other academic indicator. Pulaski County’s choice was graduation and attendance rate, Patton said.
While as a school division, PCPS met AYP goals, not every school met individual AYP goals. Seven out of the nine schools in the county, including Pulaski County High School, both Pulaski and Dublin Middle School, Critzer Elementary, Snowville Elementary, Newbern Elementary and Riverlawn Elementary met AYP goals. However, Dublin Elementary and Pulaski Elementary did not.
Despite that fact, this is still an improvement from the 2006-07 school year, Patton said.
Last year, only five of Pulaski County’s nine schools reached AYP goals (PES, DES, PMS and DMS did not make AYP last year), and as a school division, PCPS did not meet those goals overall.
In addition, while DES and PES did not make AYP this year, they improved from two areas of sanction to one, meaning that instead of not meeting the benchmarks in both reading/language arts and math, they met at least one of those benchmarks this year, which is an improvement, Patton said.
“While it’s not 100 percent, it’s definitely improvement across the board,” Patton said.
In addition, only one of the subgroups — which includes all, white, black, Hispanic, limited English proficiency, disadvantaged and disabled students — was cited as an area in need of improvement, and that was the disadvantaged subgroup. Patton noted students could fit into more than one subgroup.
“Our area of greatest need right now is our disadvantaged students,” Patton said.
You may contact Jena Hardy at jena@southwesttimes.com