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Carts won’t be on streets anytime soon

PULASKI — It looks as though golf carts will not be traversing streets in the Town of Pulaski anytime soon.
At its meeting Tuesday night, the Pulaski Town Council chose to take no action on a request by a couple of town business owners to authorize golf carts as alternative forms of transportation on town streets.
Last month, the Council asked Town Manager John Hawley to find out how much it would cost to have an engineering study of the town’s streets to determine which are suitable for golf cart use.
Last night, Hawley said one of three firms that responded to his request for a quote indicated the cost would be approximately $1,000 per street, dependent upon conditions such as street length and location.
Hawley said a second firm chose not to respond, and a third didn’t want to get involved in such a study due to liability concerns. He explained that the firm’s owner indicated participation in the study would put the firm’s reputation and insurance “on the line” to certify a public street as being safe for golf cart traffic.
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said he was told by the mayor of Colonial Beach that the study could be conducted by Virginia Department of Transportation at no cost to the town. Although Colonial Beach allows golf carts on its streets, Burchett said he couldn’t help but notice how flat the terrain is in that town when compared with Pulaski’s.
Hawley said he could check with VDOT about doing the study, but he has never known the department to participate in “in-town projects.”
Councilman Morgan Welker said it is possible VDOT did the study in Colonial Beach if the population there is under 3,500.
Welker said he has “kind of been supportive” of the golf cart request with the exception of a request to lower all speed limits in town to 25 miles per hour. However, he said, given the number or problems it could create in town, he is having second thoughts.
He said it seems there are a lot of other options for reducing gas usage, such as scooters, motorcycles, compact cars and electric cars. He noted that a variety of alternatives are going to be developed due to increasing gas prices, so “I’m starting to feel like we might need to put this aside.”
He said that by the time the town gets through doing all the studies that will be required to allow golf carts to be driven on town streets, “they might be obsolete anyway.”
Councilman H.M. Kidd said he wouldn’t have a problem with the carts if they could be “beefed up” in terms of safety and being able to maintain a sufficient speed on the town’s hills.
Mayor Jeff Worrell suggested that the Town Council move on to discussion of other matters on the agenda, so no action was taken by the Council Tuesday night.

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Carts won’t be on streets anytime soon

PULASKI — It looks as though golf carts will not be traversing streets in the Town of Pulaski anytime soon.
At its meeting Tuesday night, the Pulaski Town Council chose to take no action on a request by a couple of town business owners to authorize golf carts as alternative forms of transportation on town streets.
Last month, the Council asked Town Manager John Hawley to find out how much it would cost to have an engineering study of the town’s streets to determine which are suitable for golf cart use.
Last night, Hawley said one of three firms that responded to his request for a quote indicated the cost would be approximately $1,000 per street, dependent upon conditions such as street length and location.
Hawley said a second firm chose not to respond, and a third didn’t want to get involved in such a study due to liability concerns. He explained that the firm’s owner indicated participation in the study would put the firm’s reputation and insurance “on the line” to certify a public street as being safe for golf cart traffic.
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said he was told by the mayor of Colonial Beach that the study could be conducted by Virginia Department of Transportation at no cost to the town. Although Colonial Beach allows golf carts on its streets, Burchett said he couldn’t help but notice how flat the terrain is in that town when compared with Pulaski’s.
Hawley said he could check with VDOT about doing the study, but he has never known the department to participate in “in-town projects.”
Councilman Morgan Welker said it is possible VDOT did the study in Colonial Beach if the population there is under 3,500.
Welker said he has “kind of been supportive” of the golf cart request with the exception of a request to lower all speed limits in town to 25 miles per hour. However, he said, given the number or problems it could create in town, he is having second thoughts.
He said it seems there are a lot of other options for reducing gas usage, such as scooters, motorcycles, compact cars and electric cars. He noted that a variety of alternatives are going to be developed due to increasing gas prices, so “I’m starting to feel like we might need to put this aside.”
He said that by the time the town gets through doing all the studies that will be required to allow golf carts to be driven on town streets, “they might be obsolete anyway.”
Councilman H.M. Kidd said he wouldn’t have a problem with the carts if they could be “beefed up” in terms of safety and being able to maintain a sufficient speed on the town’s hills.
Mayor Jeff Worrell suggested that the Town Council move on to discussion of other matters on the agenda, so no action was taken by the Council Tuesday night.

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