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Volvo plant workers get bad news

DUBLIN — Nearly a thousand workers will have their jobs eliminated or they will be placed on indefinite layoff as a result of a declining economy and changes at the Volvo Trucks North America plant in Dublin.
According to a letter sent from Volvo to Pulaski County Administrator Peter Huber Friday, the 973 positions placed on temporary layoff at the plant in May now will be “on a permanent basis.”
The letter from Denise Hughes, the New River Valley plant’s human resources manager, was sent to the county under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act. A similar letter also was sent to UAW Local 2069 President Lester Hancock.
Volvo recently announced that it will move its Mack truck production from the Dublin plant to the Mack Macungie facility in Pennsylvania. As a result, about 540 UAW “bargaining unit positions” at the local plant “will be eliminated permanently,” Hughes states in the letter to Hancock.
She goes on to say that the Mack shutdown is expected to take place over a 14-day period from Oct. 30 to Nov. 13.
The letter to Hancock states that Volvo had anticipated a majority of the May layoffs to be temporary until build rates increased around September or October of this year.
Although Volvo’s build rate is still expected to increase, Hughes states that the Mack unit closure and a “deterioration of the American economy” has affected the company’s ability to recall the laid off workers.
“Taking into account all of these factors, the overall outcome on the NRV build rate is that the projected NRV build rate is expected to remain in its present state following the loss of the Mack production work,” Hughes says in Hancock’s letter.
She states that only the bargaining unit employees presently on layoff “will actually suffer a permanent employment loss” due to the Mack move. However, she adds, “Volvo no longer projects” any of the laid off workers from May (those not affected by the Mack closure) “will be recalled by Nov. 15, 2008, and therefore, we are advising you (Hancock) that temporary layoffs are being extended indefinitely and that they should be considered permanent for purposes of the WARN Act.”
According to Hughes, seniority provisions established in the collective bargaining agreement from earlier this year will be used to determine the status of each worker not affected by the Mack unit closure.
In her letter to Huber, Hughes states that one non-bargaining (non-union) employee, a production advisor, was placed on extended layoff.

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Volvo plant workers get bad news

DUBLIN — Nearly a thousand workers will have their jobs eliminated or they will be placed on indefinite layoff as a result of a declining economy and changes at the Volvo Trucks North America plant in Dublin.
According to a letter sent from Volvo to Pulaski County Administrator Peter Huber Friday, the 973 positions placed on temporary layoff at the plant in May now will be “on a permanent basis.”
The letter from Denise Hughes, the New River Valley plant’s human resources manager, was sent to the county under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act. A similar letter also was sent to UAW Local 2069 President Lester Hancock.
Volvo recently announced that it will move its Mack truck production from the Dublin plant to the Mack Macungie facility in Pennsylvania. As a result, about 540 UAW “bargaining unit positions” at the local plant “will be eliminated permanently,” Hughes states in the letter to Hancock.
She goes on to say that the Mack shutdown is expected to take place over a 14-day period from Oct. 30 to Nov. 13.
The letter to Hancock states that Volvo had anticipated a majority of the May layoffs to be temporary until build rates increased around September or October of this year.
Although Volvo’s build rate is still expected to increase, Hughes states that the Mack unit closure and a “deterioration of the American economy” has affected the company’s ability to recall the laid off workers.
“Taking into account all of these factors, the overall outcome on the NRV build rate is that the projected NRV build rate is expected to remain in its present state following the loss of the Mack production work,” Hughes says in Hancock’s letter.
She states that only the bargaining unit employees presently on layoff “will actually suffer a permanent employment loss” due to the Mack move. However, she adds, “Volvo no longer projects” any of the laid off workers from May (those not affected by the Mack closure) “will be recalled by Nov. 15, 2008, and therefore, we are advising you (Hancock) that temporary layoffs are being extended indefinitely and that they should be considered permanent for purposes of the WARN Act.”
According to Hughes, seniority provisions established in the collective bargaining agreement from earlier this year will be used to determine the status of each worker not affected by the Mack unit closure.
In her letter to Huber, Hughes states that one non-bargaining (non-union) employee, a production advisor, was placed on extended layoff.

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