Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Peppers Ferry sulfate project nearly finished

FAIRLAWN — After several years of disagreements over financial responsibility for sulfate damages at Peppers Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, the issue will soon officially be put to rest.
Executive Director Clarke Wallcraft told the authority’s board of directors, at this month’s meeting, “we’re fast approaching the end of this project.” He estimated completion to be sometime around the end of August.
According to information Wallcraft provided to the board, the total project is about 94 percent complete.
To date, the estimated $2 million project stands at almost $1.9 million. Of that amount, the Town of Pulaski has paid just over $1.1 million or about 62 percent.
The board voted in December 2006 to assess the town for 84.1 percent of the repair costs rather than it’s standard 40 percent share of operating costs. The board attributed excessive sulfates in wastewater treated at the plant to industries such as Nanochemonics and the new James Hardie plant.
Later, the board agreed to give the town credit for depreciation on some of the damaged equipment, thus reducing the town’s share to around 64 percent.
The following amounts have been paid to date by the five other jurisdictions served by Peppers Ferry:
• City of Radford – $386,346;
• Pulaski County Public Service Authority – $116,275;
• Dublin – $91,877;
• Pulaski County Sewerage Authority (which serves the Fairlawn and Belspring areas) – $61,882; and
• Montgomery County Public Service Authority – $55,309.
The board’s decision to include depreciation on some items ended up increasing the other jurisdictions’ repair costs. However, Wallcraft suggested the $9,000 to $10,000 in extra costs to other jurisdictions this year be paid out of the facility’s reserve fund since the authority already had held a public hearing on its 2008-09 budget.
Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell, who is on the authority board, said the Town of Pulaski is concerned because there is no accurate way to determine the percentage of damage caused by each jurisdiction.
“The whole debate goes back to anyone can jiggle the numbers (and reach different conclusions). No matter what we come up with it’ll be inaccurate. If it’s inaccurate, it’s unfair,” he said.
Earlier this year, Town Manager John Hawley equated the board’s efforts to “trying to hit a moving target.”

Comments

comments

Peppers Ferry sulfate project nearly finished

FAIRLAWN — After several years of disagreements over financial responsibility for sulfate damages at Peppers Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, the issue will soon officially be put to rest.
Executive Director Clarke Wallcraft told the authority’s board of directors, at this month’s meeting, “we’re fast approaching the end of this project.” He estimated completion to be sometime around the end of August.
According to information Wallcraft provided to the board, the total project is about 94 percent complete.
To date, the estimated $2 million project stands at almost $1.9 million. Of that amount, the Town of Pulaski has paid just over $1.1 million or about 62 percent.
The board voted in December 2006 to assess the town for 84.1 percent of the repair costs rather than it’s standard 40 percent share of operating costs. The board attributed excessive sulfates in wastewater treated at the plant to industries such as Nanochemonics and the new James Hardie plant.
Later, the board agreed to give the town credit for depreciation on some of the damaged equipment, thus reducing the town’s share to around 64 percent.
The following amounts have been paid to date by the five other jurisdictions served by Peppers Ferry:
• City of Radford – $386,346;
• Pulaski County Public Service Authority – $116,275;
• Dublin – $91,877;
• Pulaski County Sewerage Authority (which serves the Fairlawn and Belspring areas) – $61,882; and
• Montgomery County Public Service Authority – $55,309.
The board’s decision to include depreciation on some items ended up increasing the other jurisdictions’ repair costs. However, Wallcraft suggested the $9,000 to $10,000 in extra costs to other jurisdictions this year be paid out of the facility’s reserve fund since the authority already had held a public hearing on its 2008-09 budget.
Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell, who is on the authority board, said the Town of Pulaski is concerned because there is no accurate way to determine the percentage of damage caused by each jurisdiction.
“The whole debate goes back to anyone can jiggle the numbers (and reach different conclusions). No matter what we come up with it’ll be inaccurate. If it’s inaccurate, it’s unfair,” he said.
Earlier this year, Town Manager John Hawley equated the board’s efforts to “trying to hit a moving target.”

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login