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Board OK’s permit for cell phone tower

FAIRLAWN — Motorists passing through the Belspring/Gate 10 Road area often find themselves encountering the dreaded “dead zone.”
But Verizon Wireless has obtained a special use permit that should make that particular dead zone a thing of the past.
Dead zones are areas where cell phone reception isn’t available.
Despite the objection of a nearby property owner, the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors has approved a special use permit that will allow the cell phone service provider to erect a 199-foot tower at 7451 Peppers Ferry Boulevard in the Cloyd Magisterial District.
The property is owned by Mason Farm LLC and Dalton-Ratcliffe Farm LLC.
Verizon spokesman Julian Pedini said the new tower is needed because towers serving that area are already at or near capacity, and coverage needs to be expanded along the Belspring/Gate 10 Road area.
Board of Supervisors Chairman Joe Sheffey, who represents Cloyd District, asked whether the tower would address a dead zone on Route 11 in the vicinity of New River Valley Speedway.
Pedini wasn’t familiar with the area to which Sheffey was referring, but he said he didn’t think this tower would serve that area.
Ben Setliff, who lives about 410 feet from the proposed tower site, said he is concerned about “perceived” health risks and reduced property values as the result of cell phone towers.
He pointed out that one of the county’s highest-quality housing developments is in that area.
Setliff said some studies have shown a “three-fold” increase in cancer in residents living near cellular towers.
While he called Interstate 81 the “nightmare” of the past, he said cell phone towers are the new nightmare.
He said people had their “front yards” taken to make way for the interstate years ago, now cell phone towers are popping up everywhere, taking property and tarnishing pristine views.
“I don’t want to be viewed as a delusional person walking around with a tin-foil hat on,” Setliff said.
However, Setliff said, he is concerned about the ill effects of a tower so near his property.
If they were not inclined to stop the tower, he asked that the supervisors move it out of the line of sight of his home and the rest of the housing development.
Ingles District Supervisor Ranny Akers cast the sole dissenting vote in the Board of Supervisors’ 4-1 vote in favor of the special use permit.

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Board OK’s permit for cell phone tower

FAIRLAWN — Motorists passing through the Belspring/Gate 10 Road area often find themselves encountering the dreaded “dead zone.”
But Verizon Wireless has obtained a special use permit that should make that particular dead zone a thing of the past.
Dead zones are areas where cell phone reception isn’t available.
Despite the objection of a nearby property owner, the Pulaski County Board of Supervisors has approved a special use permit that will allow the cell phone service provider to erect a 199-foot tower at 7451 Peppers Ferry Boulevard in the Cloyd Magisterial District.
The property is owned by Mason Farm LLC and Dalton-Ratcliffe Farm LLC.
Verizon spokesman Julian Pedini said the new tower is needed because towers serving that area are already at or near capacity, and coverage needs to be expanded along the Belspring/Gate 10 Road area.
Board of Supervisors Chairman Joe Sheffey, who represents Cloyd District, asked whether the tower would address a dead zone on Route 11 in the vicinity of New River Valley Speedway.
Pedini wasn’t familiar with the area to which Sheffey was referring, but he said he didn’t think this tower would serve that area.
Ben Setliff, who lives about 410 feet from the proposed tower site, said he is concerned about “perceived” health risks and reduced property values as the result of cell phone towers.
He pointed out that one of the county’s highest-quality housing developments is in that area.
Setliff said some studies have shown a “three-fold” increase in cancer in residents living near cellular towers.
While he called Interstate 81 the “nightmare” of the past, he said cell phone towers are the new nightmare.
He said people had their “front yards” taken to make way for the interstate years ago, now cell phone towers are popping up everywhere, taking property and tarnishing pristine views.
“I don’t want to be viewed as a delusional person walking around with a tin-foil hat on,” Setliff said.
However, Setliff said, he is concerned about the ill effects of a tower so near his property.
If they were not inclined to stop the tower, he asked that the supervisors move it out of the line of sight of his home and the rest of the housing development.
Ingles District Supervisor Ranny Akers cast the sole dissenting vote in the Board of Supervisors’ 4-1 vote in favor of the special use permit.

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