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Kilgore: Firm not moving

WISE COUNTY — A story in a Bristol newspaper Friday sparked some local concern that Pulaski might be losing one of its primary industries.
But First District Delegate Terry Kilgore (R-Gate City) says Pulaski-based NanoChemonics is merely partnering in an energy research project in that area, not “moving” there.
The story in the Bristol Herald Courier quoted Kilgore as saying that the Pulaski business “has already agreed to move its operations” to a Wise County facility to be developed with funding from Virginia’s Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission.
Kilgore chairs the commission, which met Thursday in Bristol.
Neither Tim Hopkins nor Carmine DiNitto of NanoChemonics could be reached for comment Friday, but Kilgore said the company would merely be partnering with other corporations and universities to study alternate energy sources.
The Wise County center would be one of two created by $12 million in funding from the tobacco commission, according to Kilgore. The other center is planned for Abingdon.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley said Friday it was his understanding NanoChemonics’ participation in the project would be an expansion of sorts rather than a move from Pulaski.
He said he received an email from Pulaski Economic Development Director John White just before noon Friday, addressing the story. He noted it was White’s understanding the company was just expanding.
“We knew they were (seeking) some funding in that area,” Hawley said of the nanotechnology company.
This past year, NanoChemonics joined with the Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County in a grant program to study the feasibility of establishing a nanotechnology park locally.
According to Kilgore, the University of Virginia has agreed to take part in the Wise County project, which would be in the Lonesome Pine Technology Park. The center would study clean coal technology and possibly solar power.
According to its web site, the tobacco commission was created by the Virginia General Assembly in 1999 to make payments to farmers to compensate for the decline of tobacco quotas and to promote economic growth and development in tobacco-dependent communities. Pulaski County is not within the commission’s territory, but neighboring Bland, Carroll, Floyd and Wythe counties are included.

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Kilgore: Firm not moving

WISE COUNTY — A story in a Bristol newspaper Friday sparked some local concern that Pulaski might be losing one of its primary industries.
But First District Delegate Terry Kilgore (R-Gate City) says Pulaski-based NanoChemonics is merely partnering in an energy research project in that area, not “moving” there.
The story in the Bristol Herald Courier quoted Kilgore as saying that the Pulaski business “has already agreed to move its operations” to a Wise County facility to be developed with funding from Virginia’s Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission.
Kilgore chairs the commission, which met Thursday in Bristol.
Neither Tim Hopkins nor Carmine DiNitto of NanoChemonics could be reached for comment Friday, but Kilgore said the company would merely be partnering with other corporations and universities to study alternate energy sources.
The Wise County center would be one of two created by $12 million in funding from the tobacco commission, according to Kilgore. The other center is planned for Abingdon.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley said Friday it was his understanding NanoChemonics’ participation in the project would be an expansion of sorts rather than a move from Pulaski.
He said he received an email from Pulaski Economic Development Director John White just before noon Friday, addressing the story. He noted it was White’s understanding the company was just expanding.
“We knew they were (seeking) some funding in that area,” Hawley said of the nanotechnology company.
This past year, NanoChemonics joined with the Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County in a grant program to study the feasibility of establishing a nanotechnology park locally.
According to Kilgore, the University of Virginia has agreed to take part in the Wise County project, which would be in the Lonesome Pine Technology Park. The center would study clean coal technology and possibly solar power.
According to its web site, the tobacco commission was created by the Virginia General Assembly in 1999 to make payments to farmers to compensate for the decline of tobacco quotas and to promote economic growth and development in tobacco-dependent communities. Pulaski County is not within the commission’s territory, but neighboring Bland, Carroll, Floyd and Wythe counties are included.

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