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Warner campaigns in Pulaski County

PULASKI — Former Gov. Mark Warner, the Democratic Party’s candidate in this year’s U.S. Senate race, stopped in Pulaski County Thursday afternoon to tour area tourist attractions, meet area citizens and do some campaigning.
In addition to an hour-long visit to the New River Valley Fair, where he called a round of bingo for the Pulaski Jaycees, Warner also toured the Pulaski Theatre, the Fine Arts Center for the New River Valley and Coffee Buy the Book — all on Main Street in downtown Pulaski.
The Friends of Pulaski Theatre President Mike Fleenor said the group hopes to have the theatre ready for opening in 30 to 60 days.
Fleenor, who also is chairman of Pulaski County’s Democratic Party, was Warner’s guide Thursday.
During his tour of the theater, Warner commented on how so many old town theaters are being “brought back” to life. He equated the “rebirth of the theater” to the rebirth of towns in general.
He said one of his goals as a U.S. senator will be to develop a group of eight to 12 non-partisan legislators to see that action gets accomplished in Washington. He said he is tired of government issues reaching a stalemate due to bickering among parties and the inability to reach a consensus.
Warner also touched on the ever-popular issue of gas prices and the need for a new energy plan.
He said it is imperative the nation find a way to eliminate its dependence on foreign oil suppliers.
While he agrees it is important for the United States to beef up domestic production with off-shore drilling, he noted that the nation cannot rely entirely upon domestic oil because it will take at least a decade to benefit from its production.
“It’s going to take solar (energy), it’s going to take wind, it’s going to take a fresh look at nuclear power,” he said.
“It’s going to take finding ways to burn coal and do it cleaner,” Warner said.
In fact, he said energy research is so important to the nation that he would recommend youth over the next 25 years enter the energy field for a profession.
He said the nation must develop more fuel-efficient vehicles as well, adding that General Motors is talking about producing a 100-miles-per-gallon vehicle by next year.
Warner went on to suggest citizens receive $5,000 tax credits for purchasing fuel-efficient vehicles.
He also said it is important the nation work to rebuild its infrastructure, including rail and internet access for everyone.
During his visit to the Fine Arts Center, Warner discussed funding and viewed a model of the proposed center when it moves into the former Rutherford Pontiac building at the corner of Washington Avenue and Fifth Street.
At the NRV Fair, Warner visited with fair-goers and sampled some of the famous Dublin Lions Club corn dogs, in addition to calling the round of bingo.

Warner campaigns in Pulaski County

PULASKI — Former Gov. Mark Warner, the Democratic Party’s candidate in this year’s U.S. Senate race, stopped in Pulaski County Thursday afternoon to tour area tourist attractions, meet area citizens and do some campaigning.
In addition to an hour-long visit to the New River Valley Fair, where he called a round of bingo for the Pulaski Jaycees, Warner also toured the Pulaski Theatre, the Fine Arts Center for the New River Valley and Coffee Buy the Book — all on Main Street in downtown Pulaski.
The Friends of Pulaski Theatre President Mike Fleenor said the group hopes to have the theatre ready for opening in 30 to 60 days.
Fleenor, who also is chairman of Pulaski County’s Democratic Party, was Warner’s guide Thursday.
During his tour of the theater, Warner commented on how so many old town theaters are being “brought back” to life. He equated the “rebirth of the theater” to the rebirth of towns in general.
He said one of his goals as a U.S. senator will be to develop a group of eight to 12 non-partisan legislators to see that action gets accomplished in Washington. He said he is tired of government issues reaching a stalemate due to bickering among parties and the inability to reach a consensus.
Warner also touched on the ever-popular issue of gas prices and the need for a new energy plan.
He said it is imperative the nation find a way to eliminate its dependence on foreign oil suppliers.
While he agrees it is important for the United States to beef up domestic production with off-shore drilling, he noted that the nation cannot rely entirely upon domestic oil because it will take at least a decade to benefit from its production.
“It’s going to take solar (energy), it’s going to take wind, it’s going to take a fresh look at nuclear power,” he said.
“It’s going to take finding ways to burn coal and do it cleaner,” Warner said.
In fact, he said energy research is so important to the nation that he would recommend youth over the next 25 years enter the energy field for a profession.
He said the nation must develop more fuel-efficient vehicles as well, adding that General Motors is talking about producing a 100-miles-per-gallon vehicle by next year.
Warner went on to suggest citizens receive $5,000 tax credits for purchasing fuel-efficient vehicles.
He also said it is important the nation work to rebuild its infrastructure, including rail and internet access for everyone.
During his visit to the Fine Arts Center, Warner discussed funding and viewed a model of the proposed center when it moves into the former Rutherford Pontiac building at the corner of Washington Avenue and Fifth Street.
At the NRV Fair, Warner visited with fair-goers and sampled some of the famous Dublin Lions Club corn dogs, in addition to calling the round of bingo.