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Pulaski woman picked as convention delegate

PULASKI — A local college student has been given the opportunity to experience what she describes as an event of “historic magnitude.”
From Aug. 25 through Aug. 28, Elizabeth Chitwood, 22, of Pulaski, will serve as one among 54 Virginia delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colo.
Chitwood’s journey to Denver began this past May when she, along with three other people from the Ninth Congressional District in Virginia, which stretches from Bristol to Roanoke, were elected to attend the convention.
Chitwood explained that two female delegates in support of Hillary Clinton, along with one male delegate in support of Clinton and one male in support of Barack Obama were chosen in the Ninth District. Chitwood was one among the two females in support of Clinton, and noted that even though Clinton has dropped out of the presidential race, she is still bound to vote for her on the first ballot that is cast.
During the week of the convention, Chitwood will attend breakfast/morning meetings with state delegation, will attend daily Democratic caucus and council meetings at the Colorado Convention Center, followed by evening speeches and events at the Pepsi Center.
On the closing night of the convention, Chitwood, along with more than 70,000 other people, will witness Obama accept the Democratic presidential nomination at Invesco Field at Mile High, which is the home field for the Denver Broncos.
“It’s definitely going to be an experience that I will not ever forget,” Chitwood said.
“Any convention is history in the making,” she added, but with presidential hopefuls like Obama and Clinton and what they have been trying to put together and put forth, “this is going to be history in the making plus more.”
In going to Denver this August, Chitwood, who has been active within the Pulaski County Democratic Party for the past seven years and currently serves as its secretary, will follow in the footsteps of several other Pulaski County Democrats who have attended the Democratic Convention in years past, including Phillip Hawks, Gary Hancock and former Judge Bill Thomas, who attended the 1960 convention as a delegate for John F. Kennedy.
While adults of all ages attend the convention, Chitwood said that as a 22-year-old college student, she believes she will probably be one among a minority of young delegates in attendance.
When she first submitted her intent to be elected to serve as a delegate at the convention, Chitwood said she didn’t think she would be elected.
“A former teacher of mine, Jackie Freeman, suggested I run,” Chitwood said. “I pondered the idea and then decided I didn’t have anything to lose, so I ran.”
While the convention only lasts four days, Chitwood will actually be spending a total of eight days in Denver. She will be traveling solo, so during those four extra days, she plans to “explore” what she expects to be a “very electrifying city.”
Already, Chitwood’s trip to Denver has been expensive, especially when it came to buying a plane ticket, but she said that she has “great supporters in the community helping me out, and I am deeply appreciative for all of their support.”
Chitwood is a 2004 graduate of Pulaski County High School and will graduate from Radford University in May 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice.
In the future, she aspires to attend law school.
Currently, she works for the economic development office for the Town of Pulaski.

Pulaski woman picked as convention delegate

PULASKI — A local college student has been given the opportunity to experience what she describes as an event of “historic magnitude.”
From Aug. 25 through Aug. 28, Elizabeth Chitwood, 22, of Pulaski, will serve as one among 54 Virginia delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colo.
Chitwood’s journey to Denver began this past May when she, along with three other people from the Ninth Congressional District in Virginia, which stretches from Bristol to Roanoke, were elected to attend the convention.
Chitwood explained that two female delegates in support of Hillary Clinton, along with one male delegate in support of Clinton and one male in support of Barack Obama were chosen in the Ninth District. Chitwood was one among the two females in support of Clinton, and noted that even though Clinton has dropped out of the presidential race, she is still bound to vote for her on the first ballot that is cast.
During the week of the convention, Chitwood will attend breakfast/morning meetings with state delegation, will attend daily Democratic caucus and council meetings at the Colorado Convention Center, followed by evening speeches and events at the Pepsi Center.
On the closing night of the convention, Chitwood, along with more than 70,000 other people, will witness Obama accept the Democratic presidential nomination at Invesco Field at Mile High, which is the home field for the Denver Broncos.
“It’s definitely going to be an experience that I will not ever forget,” Chitwood said.
“Any convention is history in the making,” she added, but with presidential hopefuls like Obama and Clinton and what they have been trying to put together and put forth, “this is going to be history in the making plus more.”
In going to Denver this August, Chitwood, who has been active within the Pulaski County Democratic Party for the past seven years and currently serves as its secretary, will follow in the footsteps of several other Pulaski County Democrats who have attended the Democratic Convention in years past, including Phillip Hawks, Gary Hancock and former Judge Bill Thomas, who attended the 1960 convention as a delegate for John F. Kennedy.
While adults of all ages attend the convention, Chitwood said that as a 22-year-old college student, she believes she will probably be one among a minority of young delegates in attendance.
When she first submitted her intent to be elected to serve as a delegate at the convention, Chitwood said she didn’t think she would be elected.
“A former teacher of mine, Jackie Freeman, suggested I run,” Chitwood said. “I pondered the idea and then decided I didn’t have anything to lose, so I ran.”
While the convention only lasts four days, Chitwood will actually be spending a total of eight days in Denver. She will be traveling solo, so during those four extra days, she plans to “explore” what she expects to be a “very electrifying city.”
Already, Chitwood’s trip to Denver has been expensive, especially when it came to buying a plane ticket, but she said that she has “great supporters in the community helping me out, and I am deeply appreciative for all of their support.”
Chitwood is a 2004 graduate of Pulaski County High School and will graduate from Radford University in May 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice.
In the future, she aspires to attend law school.
Currently, she works for the economic development office for the Town of Pulaski.