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Council concerned about safety issues

PULASKI — With rising fuel prices, alternative forms of transportation are becoming more popular in the Town of Pulaski and other areas.
As a result, the Pulaski Town Council has decided it’s time to address safety issues pertaining to these automobile alternatives.
Pulaski Police Department Capt. Tony Meredith said one of the biggest problems police are seeing when it comes to bicycles on town roads is that the bicycle riders, particularly younger riders, don’t know that a bike is considered a vehicle once it is on public roads.
He said police see a lot of young cyclists riding in the wrong direction on roads. Many parents also are unaware of bicycling laws, he added.
At Wednesday afternoon’s Town Council work session, the council discussed whether it is necessary for the town to develop ordinances to address alternative transportation safety issues.
For example, council members question whether the town should require bicyclists and scooter operators to wear safety helmets while on public streets.
“I don’t know that we need to draft something tonight, but I think we need to look at it,” Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said.
He said the biggest problem he sees with the new scooters is traffic back-ups caused by scooters traveling at 35 miles per hour on roads with 55-miles-per-hour speed limits.
Meredith said scooter operators are supposed to move over and allow vehicles to pass in that situation, but it doesn’t always happen.
The councilmen agreed they would like the town to be able to accept alternative forms of transportation but still keep the streets safe.
Mayor Jeff Worrell said he thinks the state legislature could help address a lot of the problems stemming from alternative transportation by establishing statewide laws.
In the end, the Town Council decided it would be a good idea to develop some public service announcements, speak with state legislators about possible new laws, send out press releases and information to area schools, and hold safety events to make the public more aware of safety issues.
Since insurance coverage is not required for people operating scooters on public roads, Councilman Robert Bopp asked who would be responsible for damage if a vehicle and scooter were to collide.
Town Attorney David Warburton said the motorist would have to pick up the tab if he or she is involved in a collision with any uninsured motorist, including a scooter operator.
“You’re out of luck if you’re injured by someone who doesn’t have insurance or assets to cover your losses,” Warburton added.

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Council concerned about safety issues

PULASKI — With rising fuel prices, alternative forms of transportation are becoming more popular in the Town of Pulaski and other areas.
As a result, the Pulaski Town Council has decided it’s time to address safety issues pertaining to these automobile alternatives.
Pulaski Police Department Capt. Tony Meredith said one of the biggest problems police are seeing when it comes to bicycles on town roads is that the bicycle riders, particularly younger riders, don’t know that a bike is considered a vehicle once it is on public roads.
He said police see a lot of young cyclists riding in the wrong direction on roads. Many parents also are unaware of bicycling laws, he added.
At Wednesday afternoon’s Town Council work session, the council discussed whether it is necessary for the town to develop ordinances to address alternative transportation safety issues.
For example, council members question whether the town should require bicyclists and scooter operators to wear safety helmets while on public streets.
“I don’t know that we need to draft something tonight, but I think we need to look at it,” Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said.
He said the biggest problem he sees with the new scooters is traffic back-ups caused by scooters traveling at 35 miles per hour on roads with 55-miles-per-hour speed limits.
Meredith said scooter operators are supposed to move over and allow vehicles to pass in that situation, but it doesn’t always happen.
The councilmen agreed they would like the town to be able to accept alternative forms of transportation but still keep the streets safe.
Mayor Jeff Worrell said he thinks the state legislature could help address a lot of the problems stemming from alternative transportation by establishing statewide laws.
In the end, the Town Council decided it would be a good idea to develop some public service announcements, speak with state legislators about possible new laws, send out press releases and information to area schools, and hold safety events to make the public more aware of safety issues.
Since insurance coverage is not required for people operating scooters on public roads, Councilman Robert Bopp asked who would be responsible for damage if a vehicle and scooter were to collide.
Town Attorney David Warburton said the motorist would have to pick up the tab if he or she is involved in a collision with any uninsured motorist, including a scooter operator.
“You’re out of luck if you’re injured by someone who doesn’t have insurance or assets to cover your losses,” Warburton added.

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