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Hill leaving Revenue office

PULASKI — For nearly 34 years, many citizens have insisted on dealing with Katherine Slaughter Hill when they visit the Commissioner of the Revenue’s office.
But come this August, they’ll have to get used to a new face.
Hill, a deputy commissioner, will have worked for the county for 33 years and eight months when she officially enters the ranks of the retired Aug. 1.
She said she decided to retire this year because “I figured it was about time.
“I have good working conditions (at the commissioner’s office), but I decided I wanted to retire, so I just did it,” the Pulaski County native said. Knowing she has completed enough years (30) of service to qualify for full state retirement benefits didn’t hurt the decision.
Hill, who lives in Dublin, first joined the county staff in 1979 as a switchboard operator at the County Administration Building. Four years later she moved to the commissioner’s office to help record tax reassessment information.
She learned her new job from other employees in the office and “just picked up everything else as I went along.”
Although some computers were in use at that time, she said much of the job still had to be done manually. Now that most records are electronic, her job is a lot easier than it used to be.
Commissioner of the Revenue Trina Rupe, said Hill has gone from seeing the office packed with boxes of state tax returns for processing to a time there are hardly any.
She explained that many people now file their returns electronically, so the boxes of returns have drastically dwindled over the years to “hardly any.”
Rupe added: “She’s been here so long she has regular customers who only want to talk to her. She’s been really good with the older population. I know she’ll be missed.”
One of the more memorable points in Hill’s years of working at the commissioner’s office was the 1989 fire that destroyed the original courthouse building.
At that time, the commissioner’s office was on the first floor of the courthouse. They had their office door closed that day, but someone noticed the hall was half to three-quarters full of smoke.
Realizing there was a fire, everyone evacuated the office.
“As we were leaving, we could see a red glow in the staircase,” she recalled.
All they could do was stand outside watching as firefighters tried to save the historical courthouse.
When the clock tower collapsed, she said it was clear damage was going to be severe.
“It was sad and hard to believe — not knowing what your situation would be later,” she said. “We didn’t really know the amount of damage that had been done, but luckily no one was hurt.”
The fire took place on the Friday before New Years Day. Hill said courthouse employees were relieved there were no court cases scheduled that day due to the holiday, otherwise the situation could have been a lot worse.

Although some departments lost everything, Hill said the commissioner’s office was fortunate to have escaped serious damage. Water and heat from the blaze melted or damaged most of their furniture, but the records in their file cabinets faired pretty well.
She said some of the papers were water damaged or scorched along the edges of the pages, but most were salvageable.

The commissioner’s office ended up being relocated across from the Pulaski Post Office for nearly two years while the old courthouse was rebuilt and the newer courthouse building was remodeled.
The commissioner’s office is now on the second floor.
Hill said she has no specific plans for her retirement. Her husband, Michael, is an electrician at Volvo and is not ready for retirement.
She and Michael enjoy camping, so they probably will go a little more often than in the past. Otherwise, she said she will probably visit with family more frequently and go places with family more often.
She said she knows she will miss her co-workers and the residents she helped over the years; and she will “probably” miss her job “at some point.
“When you work every day for so many years, you’re bound to miss it some,” she added.
During her years on the job she has worked with two other commissioners besides Rupe: Maynard Sayers for 28 years and Jack Gill for four years.
Hill’s daughter and son-in-law, Sabrina and Stephen Meyers, live in Dublin.

Hill leaving Revenue office

PULASKI — For nearly 34 years, many citizens have insisted on dealing with Katherine Slaughter Hill when they visit the Commissioner of the Revenue’s office.
But come this August, they’ll have to get used to a new face.
Hill, a deputy commissioner, will have worked for the county for 33 years and eight months when she officially enters the ranks of the retired Aug. 1.
She said she decided to retire this year because “I figured it was about time.
“I have good working conditions (at the commissioner’s office), but I decided I wanted to retire, so I just did it,” the Pulaski County native said. Knowing she has completed enough years (30) of service to qualify for full state retirement benefits didn’t hurt the decision.
Hill, who lives in Dublin, first joined the county staff in 1979 as a switchboard operator at the County Administration Building. Four years later she moved to the commissioner’s office to help record tax reassessment information.
She learned her new job from other employees in the office and “just picked up everything else as I went along.”
Although some computers were in use at that time, she said much of the job still had to be done manually. Now that most records are electronic, her job is a lot easier than it used to be.
Commissioner of the Revenue Trina Rupe, said Hill has gone from seeing the office packed with boxes of state tax returns for processing to a time there are hardly any.
She explained that many people now file their returns electronically, so the boxes of returns have drastically dwindled over the years to “hardly any.”
Rupe added: “She’s been here so long she has regular customers who only want to talk to her. She’s been really good with the older population. I know she’ll be missed.”
One of the more memorable points in Hill’s years of working at the commissioner’s office was the 1989 fire that destroyed the original courthouse building.
At that time, the commissioner’s office was on the first floor of the courthouse. They had their office door closed that day, but someone noticed the hall was half to three-quarters full of smoke.
Realizing there was a fire, everyone evacuated the office.
“As we were leaving, we could see a red glow in the staircase,” she recalled.
All they could do was stand outside watching as firefighters tried to save the historical courthouse.
When the clock tower collapsed, she said it was clear damage was going to be severe.
“It was sad and hard to believe — not knowing what your situation would be later,” she said. “We didn’t really know the amount of damage that had been done, but luckily no one was hurt.”
The fire took place on the Friday before New Years Day. Hill said courthouse employees were relieved there were no court cases scheduled that day due to the holiday, otherwise the situation could have been a lot worse.

Although some departments lost everything, Hill said the commissioner’s office was fortunate to have escaped serious damage. Water and heat from the blaze melted or damaged most of their furniture, but the records in their file cabinets faired pretty well.
She said some of the papers were water damaged or scorched along the edges of the pages, but most were salvageable.

The commissioner’s office ended up being relocated across from the Pulaski Post Office for nearly two years while the old courthouse was rebuilt and the newer courthouse building was remodeled.
The commissioner’s office is now on the second floor.
Hill said she has no specific plans for her retirement. Her husband, Michael, is an electrician at Volvo and is not ready for retirement.
She and Michael enjoy camping, so they probably will go a little more often than in the past. Otherwise, she said she will probably visit with family more frequently and go places with family more often.
She said she knows she will miss her co-workers and the residents she helped over the years; and she will “probably” miss her job “at some point.
“When you work every day for so many years, you’re bound to miss it some,” she added.
During her years on the job she has worked with two other commissioners besides Rupe: Maynard Sayers for 28 years and Jack Gill for four years.
Hill’s daughter and son-in-law, Sabrina and Stephen Meyers, live in Dublin.