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U.S. Senate candidate Gilmore visits Pulaski

PULASKI — When it comes to lowering gas prices, Jim Gilmore has a few solutions in mind.
Gilmore, former governor of Virginia and Republican Party candidate for the U.S. Senate in this fall’s election, was able to share these solutions on Tuesday during a visit to the James Hardie plant in Pulaski, as part of his “Working Families” tour of the I-81 corridor.
“We started out this race thinking that the most important issue for people out there was taxation,” Gilmore said.
However, after traveling throughout the commonwealth, Gilmore found that, yes, residents agreed with him about tax issues, but still at the top of their list of concerns was and is the ever-rising cost of gas.
“People up in Washington, D.C., have got this idea that everybody everywhere across the U.S. and Virginia are going to wean themselves off gas,” Gilmore said, adding that his Democratic Party opponent for the U.S. Senate, Mark Warner, has been echoing that idea as well.
However, Gilmore said that what people across the state have been telling him is that “they can’t wean off anything,” especially those who live in rural areas and have to fill their tanks with gas (some spending as much as $75 or $80 each week) to be able to drive to work every morning.
So what does Gilmore suggest?
“We have to have a declaration of independence on energy from foreign sources,” Gilmore said.
To declare this independence, Gilmore first suggests pursuing more domestic oil production.
“That means we’ve got to go to ANWR (Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) in Alaska and drill for oil there right now,” Gilmore said. “That will bring down oil prices right away.”
In addition to drilling for oil in Alaska, Gilmore also believes that offshore drilling will be necessary to lower oil and gas prices.
“That means that the federal moratorium for oil exploration has got to come off right now,” Gilmore said. “We’ve got to drill offshore to bring in that oil.”
One James Hardie employee said that he had heard that other countries can come in and drill for oil if the U.S. doesn’t drill here.
Gilmore responded, “That’s true, and, as a matter of fact, the Chinese are preparing to drill in the Gulf of Mexico, 60 miles off the American coast, in conjunction with Cuba. They understand that there is oil available.”
Gilmore added, “The fact is people are saying that we’ll cause leakages and spoils in Alaska. But new technology is underway, so we’re not seeing the kind of leakages and spoils that we used to see. We can do it safely, and other countries are already doing it.”
He later added, “This doesn’t mean that you’re throwing the environment overboard, and it doesn’t mean that you can’t do some other work also, such as conservation and making cars more efficient, using bio-fuel and renewable resources. We can do these things too.”
Gilmore concluded his response by saying, “America has got to start looking out for America, otherwise we’re just going to keep on paying for all this oil from the Middle East and Venezuela and all these other places. We need to begin to bring this oil in. That’s going to help the entire oil market.”
After addressing the group of employees at James Hardie, Gilmore donned a hard hat and safety glasses, as he was led through a tour of the plant by Dave Kessner, vice president of manufacturing, who explained the process of creating the company’s fiber-cement siding products. Kessner noted that there are approximately 170 employees working for James Hardie in Pulaski.
Following his visit to James Hardie, Gilmore headed to Wytheville and Abingdon and ended his day in Bristol. Before stopping in Pulaski, Gilmore had paid visits to sites in Radford, Salem, Lexington, Waynesboro, Harrisonburg, Luray and Winchester.

U.S. Senate candidate Gilmore visits Pulaski

PULASKI — When it comes to lowering gas prices, Jim Gilmore has a few solutions in mind.
Gilmore, former governor of Virginia and Republican Party candidate for the U.S. Senate in this fall’s election, was able to share these solutions on Tuesday during a visit to the James Hardie plant in Pulaski, as part of his “Working Families” tour of the I-81 corridor.
“We started out this race thinking that the most important issue for people out there was taxation,” Gilmore said.
However, after traveling throughout the commonwealth, Gilmore found that, yes, residents agreed with him about tax issues, but still at the top of their list of concerns was and is the ever-rising cost of gas.
“People up in Washington, D.C., have got this idea that everybody everywhere across the U.S. and Virginia are going to wean themselves off gas,” Gilmore said, adding that his Democratic Party opponent for the U.S. Senate, Mark Warner, has been echoing that idea as well.
However, Gilmore said that what people across the state have been telling him is that “they can’t wean off anything,” especially those who live in rural areas and have to fill their tanks with gas (some spending as much as $75 or $80 each week) to be able to drive to work every morning.
So what does Gilmore suggest?
“We have to have a declaration of independence on energy from foreign sources,” Gilmore said.
To declare this independence, Gilmore first suggests pursuing more domestic oil production.
“That means we’ve got to go to ANWR (Arctic National Wildlife Refuge) in Alaska and drill for oil there right now,” Gilmore said. “That will bring down oil prices right away.”
In addition to drilling for oil in Alaska, Gilmore also believes that offshore drilling will be necessary to lower oil and gas prices.
“That means that the federal moratorium for oil exploration has got to come off right now,” Gilmore said. “We’ve got to drill offshore to bring in that oil.”
One James Hardie employee said that he had heard that other countries can come in and drill for oil if the U.S. doesn’t drill here.
Gilmore responded, “That’s true, and, as a matter of fact, the Chinese are preparing to drill in the Gulf of Mexico, 60 miles off the American coast, in conjunction with Cuba. They understand that there is oil available.”
Gilmore added, “The fact is people are saying that we’ll cause leakages and spoils in Alaska. But new technology is underway, so we’re not seeing the kind of leakages and spoils that we used to see. We can do it safely, and other countries are already doing it.”
He later added, “This doesn’t mean that you’re throwing the environment overboard, and it doesn’t mean that you can’t do some other work also, such as conservation and making cars more efficient, using bio-fuel and renewable resources. We can do these things too.”
Gilmore concluded his response by saying, “America has got to start looking out for America, otherwise we’re just going to keep on paying for all this oil from the Middle East and Venezuela and all these other places. We need to begin to bring this oil in. That’s going to help the entire oil market.”
After addressing the group of employees at James Hardie, Gilmore donned a hard hat and safety glasses, as he was led through a tour of the plant by Dave Kessner, vice president of manufacturing, who explained the process of creating the company’s fiber-cement siding products. Kessner noted that there are approximately 170 employees working for James Hardie in Pulaski.
Following his visit to James Hardie, Gilmore headed to Wytheville and Abingdon and ended his day in Bristol. Before stopping in Pulaski, Gilmore had paid visits to sites in Radford, Salem, Lexington, Waynesboro, Harrisonburg, Luray and Winchester.