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County concerned about bikers’ safety

PULASKI — Several serious bicycle crashes in the region during the past few months have prompted more awareness of the dangers bicyclists face on the road.
The Town of Pulaski recently installed “Share the Road” signs to remind motorists to watch out for bicycle riders.
Now, Pulaski County is looking to do the same.
A number of the town’s signs are posted at the corporate limits and will serve as a reminder for motorists entering the county. However, County Administrator Peter Huber, a bicyclist himself, thinks similar signs should be erected along known bike routes within the county.
Huber suggested posting the signs along the Bike 76 trail and Alum Spring and Black Hollow roads, among others.
Virginia Department of Transportation Resident Engineer David Clarke said such signs usually are installed along routes designated by the requesting jurisdiction, but he urged Pulaski County officials to limit their installation to areas cyclists are known to travel.
“They’re like ‘Children at Play’ signs. If you put them up everywhere” they become commonplace, and “they lose their meaning,” Clarke said.
Huber said he believes a car and bicycle crash in Radford that claimed the life of Radford University professor Fess Green in April was what prompted the town to install its “Share the Road” signs.
Green, a Wilderness Trail advocate and author of a book chronicling his cycling trip along the trail, died several days after his bicycle was struck by a vehicle near the entrance to Bissett Park.
Then, in early June, an Italian cyclist visiting Wythe County to train for a return to professional cycling was seriously injured when his bike was struck by a car.
According to Virginia law, bicyclists have the same rights and duties as the driver of a motor vehicle.

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County concerned about bikers’ safety

PULASKI — Several serious bicycle crashes in the region during the past few months have prompted more awareness of the dangers bicyclists face on the road.
The Town of Pulaski recently installed “Share the Road” signs to remind motorists to watch out for bicycle riders.
Now, Pulaski County is looking to do the same.
A number of the town’s signs are posted at the corporate limits and will serve as a reminder for motorists entering the county. However, County Administrator Peter Huber, a bicyclist himself, thinks similar signs should be erected along known bike routes within the county.
Huber suggested posting the signs along the Bike 76 trail and Alum Spring and Black Hollow roads, among others.
Virginia Department of Transportation Resident Engineer David Clarke said such signs usually are installed along routes designated by the requesting jurisdiction, but he urged Pulaski County officials to limit their installation to areas cyclists are known to travel.
“They’re like ‘Children at Play’ signs. If you put them up everywhere” they become commonplace, and “they lose their meaning,” Clarke said.
Huber said he believes a car and bicycle crash in Radford that claimed the life of Radford University professor Fess Green in April was what prompted the town to install its “Share the Road” signs.
Green, a Wilderness Trail advocate and author of a book chronicling his cycling trip along the trail, died several days after his bicycle was struck by a vehicle near the entrance to Bissett Park.
Then, in early June, an Italian cyclist visiting Wythe County to train for a return to professional cycling was seriously injured when his bike was struck by a car.
According to Virginia law, bicyclists have the same rights and duties as the driver of a motor vehicle.

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