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SALUTING PULASKI COUNTY’S VETERANS

(Editor’s note: This is part of a continuing series of stories spotlighting Pulaski County’s military veterans.)

DUBLIN — In the midst of World War II, Roy Hubbard answered the call of duty by volunteering to join the U.S. Army.
Hubbard, who grew up in Barren Springs, volunteered in late January 1943 and was called to duty in March.
“It was war time,” Hubbard said. “I felt like my country needed me. They needed everybody they could get.”
Hubbard completed his basic training at Camp Connolly, which was located outside of Atlanta, Ga., along with taking various other training courses that were available to him, and then headed to Pomona, Calif., in September for bookkeeping school.
In November 1943, Hubbard left the West Coast and moved to Mississippi Ordnance Plant, near Jackson, Miss. Hubbard said this was a staging area where he and his fellow soldiers began preparing to go overseas.
In January 1944, Hubbard was transferred to Camp Shanks in New York but was only there for a few days before he boarded the RMS Queen Elizabeth, a ship with 18,000 troops aboard, headed for England. Hubbard noted that during their voyage to England, the ship was unescorted.
The ship arrived in Scotland, and Hubbard and his fellow solders then boarded a train to England, where they eventually arrived at a small village called Tidworth. Located nearby was one of the largest ordnance depots in the United Kingdom at that time. During the war, this depot was taken over by the U.S. Army.
The second night that Hubbard was at Tidworth, he experienced his first air raid, and after that, they were expecting an alert almost every night as London was only 65 miles away.
Some time later, Hubbard and his company relocated to Windmill Hill, where they were housed in tents.
“We slept on the ground in pup tents, with one person to a tent,” Hubbard said. “This was in February and part of March. It rained the whole time, and we were wet the whole time. When we changed clothes, we changed from wet clothes into wet clothes. I don’t know how we existed in those winter months.”
He said the tents were in trenches, so “when you laid down, you had to sleep on your back because you were lying in water.”
By March, the men moved into bigger tents, with six men to a tent, which was “luxury living,” Hubbard said.
Hubbard said while he was in England, he was in charge of a hardware and metals warehouse. His job was to accept orders for all types of metal and equipment that were needed in preparation for the forthcoming D-Day invasion in June 1944.
Hubbard said he worked in the warehouse six days a week, and, then, on Sundays, he would test drive armored vehicles as they were taken out of their shipping materials.
“I drove them through an obstacle course to make sure that everything was working on them and that they were lined up for the invasion,” Hubbard said.

After D-Day had passed, Hubbard boarded the U.S.S. John L. Elliott and sailed across the English Channel, where the ship tried to anchor off Omaha Beach, but the water was too rough so it went further up the Seine River to Rouen, and then to Paris.
Hubbard said when he arrived in Paris, there were still German soldiers in the city, some who had been captured and “hadn’t got out yet.”
While in Paris, Hubbard was in charge of securing parts to rebuild jeep engines.
Hubbard said he had to report to the officers above him of what parts were needed ahead of time for the next two weeks because most of the parts had to be shipped from other places, mainly the U.S., but also Switzerland and other countries.
Hubbard said the factory rebuilt an average of 80 jeep engines a day.
Hubbard spent a year in Paris, and then in November 1945, he was sent on temporary duty to Belgium, where he oversaw 50 German prisoners in unloading barges of lumber.
In March 1946, Tech Sgt. Hubbard was discharged from the U.S. Army. He said that while he served, only two men died out of the 100 in his company, which was part of the 139th Ordnance Battalion.
Hubbard owns a book that includes information about his ordnance battalion, and in that book, it includes the following information about ordnance battalions during World War II: “To meet requirements, Ordnance brought 2,000,000 tons of equipment to England before D-Day, including 22,741 combat vehicles, 281,768 general and special purpose vehicles, 1,494,941 small arms weapons and 19,959 artillery pieces. Since D-Day, allied troops were supplied with 2,500,000 tons of vehicles and weapons. Artillery supply alone was 1,496,000 tons between D-Day and V-E Day. Ordnance rolled into England at the rate of 14 tons per minute. There, it was processed, assembled, waterproofed, inspected, issued and replaced in 21 storage depots. In 32 different plants, Ordnance men assembled 1,000 vehicles daily. The job of preparing thousands of the 350,000 different items which made up Ordnance equipment was endless.”
When Hubbard returned to the U.S., he began working at Burlington Industries, from which he retired after 30 years. He got married in 1947, but remarried in 1979 and has two sons and one stepson.
For his service in France, Hubbard received a certificate from the French government, recognizing his service during World War II. Currently, Hubbard, 85, resides in Dublin with his wife. He is a lifetime member of the American Legion, the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) and the DAV (Disabled American Veterans).

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SALUTING PULASKI COUNTY’S VETERANS

(Editor’s note: This is part of a continuing series of stories spotlighting Pulaski County’s military veterans.)

DUBLIN — In the midst of World War II, Roy Hubbard answered the call of duty by volunteering to join the U.S. Army.
Hubbard, who grew up in Barren Springs, volunteered in late January 1943 and was called to duty in March.
“It was war time,” Hubbard said. “I felt like my country needed me. They needed everybody they could get.”
Hubbard completed his basic training at Camp Connolly, which was located outside of Atlanta, Ga., along with taking various other training courses that were available to him, and then headed to Pomona, Calif., in September for bookkeeping school.
In November 1943, Hubbard left the West Coast and moved to Mississippi Ordnance Plant, near Jackson, Miss. Hubbard said this was a staging area where he and his fellow soldiers began preparing to go overseas.
In January 1944, Hubbard was transferred to Camp Shanks in New York but was only there for a few days before he boarded the RMS Queen Elizabeth, a ship with 18,000 troops aboard, headed for England. Hubbard noted that during their voyage to England, the ship was unescorted.
The ship arrived in Scotland, and Hubbard and his fellow solders then boarded a train to England, where they eventually arrived at a small village called Tidworth. Located nearby was one of the largest ordnance depots in the United Kingdom at that time. During the war, this depot was taken over by the U.S. Army.
The second night that Hubbard was at Tidworth, he experienced his first air raid, and after that, they were expecting an alert almost every night as London was only 65 miles away.
Some time later, Hubbard and his company relocated to Windmill Hill, where they were housed in tents.
“We slept on the ground in pup tents, with one person to a tent,” Hubbard said. “This was in February and part of March. It rained the whole time, and we were wet the whole time. When we changed clothes, we changed from wet clothes into wet clothes. I don’t know how we existed in those winter months.”
He said the tents were in trenches, so “when you laid down, you had to sleep on your back because you were lying in water.”
By March, the men moved into bigger tents, with six men to a tent, which was “luxury living,” Hubbard said.
Hubbard said while he was in England, he was in charge of a hardware and metals warehouse. His job was to accept orders for all types of metal and equipment that were needed in preparation for the forthcoming D-Day invasion in June 1944.
Hubbard said he worked in the warehouse six days a week, and, then, on Sundays, he would test drive armored vehicles as they were taken out of their shipping materials.
“I drove them through an obstacle course to make sure that everything was working on them and that they were lined up for the invasion,” Hubbard said.

After D-Day had passed, Hubbard boarded the U.S.S. John L. Elliott and sailed across the English Channel, where the ship tried to anchor off Omaha Beach, but the water was too rough so it went further up the Seine River to Rouen, and then to Paris.
Hubbard said when he arrived in Paris, there were still German soldiers in the city, some who had been captured and “hadn’t got out yet.”
While in Paris, Hubbard was in charge of securing parts to rebuild jeep engines.
Hubbard said he had to report to the officers above him of what parts were needed ahead of time for the next two weeks because most of the parts had to be shipped from other places, mainly the U.S., but also Switzerland and other countries.
Hubbard said the factory rebuilt an average of 80 jeep engines a day.
Hubbard spent a year in Paris, and then in November 1945, he was sent on temporary duty to Belgium, where he oversaw 50 German prisoners in unloading barges of lumber.
In March 1946, Tech Sgt. Hubbard was discharged from the U.S. Army. He said that while he served, only two men died out of the 100 in his company, which was part of the 139th Ordnance Battalion.
Hubbard owns a book that includes information about his ordnance battalion, and in that book, it includes the following information about ordnance battalions during World War II: “To meet requirements, Ordnance brought 2,000,000 tons of equipment to England before D-Day, including 22,741 combat vehicles, 281,768 general and special purpose vehicles, 1,494,941 small arms weapons and 19,959 artillery pieces. Since D-Day, allied troops were supplied with 2,500,000 tons of vehicles and weapons. Artillery supply alone was 1,496,000 tons between D-Day and V-E Day. Ordnance rolled into England at the rate of 14 tons per minute. There, it was processed, assembled, waterproofed, inspected, issued and replaced in 21 storage depots. In 32 different plants, Ordnance men assembled 1,000 vehicles daily. The job of preparing thousands of the 350,000 different items which made up Ordnance equipment was endless.”
When Hubbard returned to the U.S., he began working at Burlington Industries, from which he retired after 30 years. He got married in 1947, but remarried in 1979 and has two sons and one stepson.
For his service in France, Hubbard received a certificate from the French government, recognizing his service during World War II. Currently, Hubbard, 85, resides in Dublin with his wife. He is a lifetime member of the American Legion, the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) and the DAV (Disabled American Veterans).

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