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They are Hometown Heroes

PULASKI — Setting the standard for donating blood and supporting their community, Harry and Jean Gates of Pulaski are American Red Cross Hometown Heroes.
As lifelong supporters of the American Red Cross blood programs, both as donors and volunteers, the Gateses set an example for all members of the community to emulate.
To recognize these hometown heroes, a special blood drive will be held in their honor on Monday, June 30, from noon to 6 p.m. at Aldersgate United Methodist Church, located on Bob White Boulevard in Pulaski, according to Isley Quesenberry, community blood drive coordinator for Pulaski County.
The purpose of the Hometown Hero campaign is to demonstrate how ordinary community citizens can become heroes by simply giving an hour of their time and a pint of blood.
Only five percent of the eligible population donates blood regularly, yet statistics prove that by age 72, 95 percent of the population will have received at least one blood product, according to the American Red Cross, noting that if every eligible donor donated a minimum of four times a year, there would never be a shortage.
“Everyone who can donate should do so,” Quesenberry said. “It is the responsibility of all of us who can donate to do so, to make sure the blood is there for those in need or who cannot donate themselves. As community-minded citizens, it is part of our civic responsibility.”
The Hometown Hero campaign also emphasizes the opportunity for all citizens to be involved in blood drives. According to Quesenberry, “there is plenty to do for those that wish to be involved. Those who cannot donate can recruit and volunteer for the blood drives. There is room for everyone to support their community this way.”
As an example, Quesenberry has been involved with the Red Cross blood program for over 20 years, serving as the Pulaski County blood drive coordinator.
“Making sure blood is available not only here but anywhere is a priority,” she said. “We take for granted the availability of blood.”
Guy Russell, who regularly supports the local blood collection efforts and is up to his 26th gallon in donations, said, “If you are faithful and constant and donate regularly, you can donate a lot to support our community.”
In addition to honoring the Gateses, the purpose of Monday’s blood drive is to aid in fulfilling current major additional blood needs. Due to the recent flooding in the Midwest, the American Red Cross is ramping up blood donations to support the needs of all the communities affected by the disaster, particularly as many blood drives in that area have been canceled and in some cases, collection sites have been destroyed, according to the ARC. All blood types are urgently needed at this time.
Donors must weigh 110 pounds and be in good health in general and be at least 17 years of age. All donors must have an ID.
Quesenberry said the community is encouraged to come and donate in honor of the Gateses and in support of all donors, such as Russell, and to support our fellow Americans in the Midwest in their time of need.
There will also be door prizes offered throughout the day at Monday’s blood drive.

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They are Hometown Heroes

PULASKI — Setting the standard for donating blood and supporting their community, Harry and Jean Gates of Pulaski are American Red Cross Hometown Heroes.
As lifelong supporters of the American Red Cross blood programs, both as donors and volunteers, the Gateses set an example for all members of the community to emulate.
To recognize these hometown heroes, a special blood drive will be held in their honor on Monday, June 30, from noon to 6 p.m. at Aldersgate United Methodist Church, located on Bob White Boulevard in Pulaski, according to Isley Quesenberry, community blood drive coordinator for Pulaski County.
The purpose of the Hometown Hero campaign is to demonstrate how ordinary community citizens can become heroes by simply giving an hour of their time and a pint of blood.
Only five percent of the eligible population donates blood regularly, yet statistics prove that by age 72, 95 percent of the population will have received at least one blood product, according to the American Red Cross, noting that if every eligible donor donated a minimum of four times a year, there would never be a shortage.
“Everyone who can donate should do so,” Quesenberry said. “It is the responsibility of all of us who can donate to do so, to make sure the blood is there for those in need or who cannot donate themselves. As community-minded citizens, it is part of our civic responsibility.”
The Hometown Hero campaign also emphasizes the opportunity for all citizens to be involved in blood drives. According to Quesenberry, “there is plenty to do for those that wish to be involved. Those who cannot donate can recruit and volunteer for the blood drives. There is room for everyone to support their community this way.”
As an example, Quesenberry has been involved with the Red Cross blood program for over 20 years, serving as the Pulaski County blood drive coordinator.
“Making sure blood is available not only here but anywhere is a priority,” she said. “We take for granted the availability of blood.”
Guy Russell, who regularly supports the local blood collection efforts and is up to his 26th gallon in donations, said, “If you are faithful and constant and donate regularly, you can donate a lot to support our community.”
In addition to honoring the Gateses, the purpose of Monday’s blood drive is to aid in fulfilling current major additional blood needs. Due to the recent flooding in the Midwest, the American Red Cross is ramping up blood donations to support the needs of all the communities affected by the disaster, particularly as many blood drives in that area have been canceled and in some cases, collection sites have been destroyed, according to the ARC. All blood types are urgently needed at this time.
Donors must weigh 110 pounds and be in good health in general and be at least 17 years of age. All donors must have an ID.
Quesenberry said the community is encouraged to come and donate in honor of the Gateses and in support of all donors, such as Russell, and to support our fellow Americans in the Midwest in their time of need.
There will also be door prizes offered throughout the day at Monday’s blood drive.

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