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Juneteenth celebration held

CHRISTIANSBURG — The annual Juneteenth celebration was held earlier this month at Rosa Peters Park in Christiansburg.
The event was sponsored by the Floyd County-Montgomery County-Radford City Branch of the NAACP, Youth Council and Adult Branch, and New River Valley Progressive Men’s Club.
Hakim Luqmaan, secretary of the New River Valley Progressive Men’s Club, said, “The Juneteenth Celebration has been held by the local branch of the NAACP since 2000, and the purpose is to celebrate our heritage and to recognize the contributions of many African Americans. We also strive to bring the whole community together to know what Juneteenth is and to create a better understanding of diverse backgrounds.”
At the celebration, the Youth Council members presented the historical background of Juneteenth, which was followed by poems, songs and music.
Luqmaan said, “Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19 that Union soldiers, led by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas, with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, which had become official on Jan. 1, 1863.”
Luqmaan said, “The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new executive order. However, with the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee in April 1865 and the arrival of Gen. Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.”
“Juneteenth today celebrates African American freedom, while encouraging
self-development and respect for all cultures. As it takes on a more national and even global perspective, the events of 1865 in Texas are not forgotten, for all of the roots tie back to this fertile soil from which a national day of pride is growing,” Luqmaan said.
“The future of Juneteenth looks bright as the number of cities and states come on board and form local committees and organizations to coordinate the activities. Communication and networking is vital,” Luqmaan said.
“A sharing of lessons learned throughout all organizations will help expedite this growth while minimizing waste and risks. Thus, it is important to communicate its existence to one and all,” Luqmaan said.

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Juneteenth celebration held

CHRISTIANSBURG — The annual Juneteenth celebration was held earlier this month at Rosa Peters Park in Christiansburg.
The event was sponsored by the Floyd County-Montgomery County-Radford City Branch of the NAACP, Youth Council and Adult Branch, and New River Valley Progressive Men’s Club.
Hakim Luqmaan, secretary of the New River Valley Progressive Men’s Club, said, “The Juneteenth Celebration has been held by the local branch of the NAACP since 2000, and the purpose is to celebrate our heritage and to recognize the contributions of many African Americans. We also strive to bring the whole community together to know what Juneteenth is and to create a better understanding of diverse backgrounds.”
At the celebration, the Youth Council members presented the historical background of Juneteenth, which was followed by poems, songs and music.
Luqmaan said, “Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19 that Union soldiers, led by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas, with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, which had become official on Jan. 1, 1863.”
Luqmaan said, “The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new executive order. However, with the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee in April 1865 and the arrival of Gen. Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.”
“Juneteenth today celebrates African American freedom, while encouraging
self-development and respect for all cultures. As it takes on a more national and even global perspective, the events of 1865 in Texas are not forgotten, for all of the roots tie back to this fertile soil from which a national day of pride is growing,” Luqmaan said.
“The future of Juneteenth looks bright as the number of cities and states come on board and form local committees and organizations to coordinate the activities. Communication and networking is vital,” Luqmaan said.
“A sharing of lessons learned throughout all organizations will help expedite this growth while minimizing waste and risks. Thus, it is important to communicate its existence to one and all,” Luqmaan said.

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