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Ham radio operators will have field day

DUBLIN — Thousands of ham radio operators will be demonstrating their emergency capabilities on Saturday, June 28, through noon, Sunday, June 29.
During the past year, the news has been full of reports of ham radio operators providing critical communications in emergencies world-wide.
During the current flooding in the Midwest and with Hurricane Katrina, amateur radio, often call “ham radio, “ has frequently been the only way people could communicate, and hundreds of volunteer “hams” traveled to these locations to help in saving lives and property.
When trouble is brewing, ham radio operators are often the first to provide critical information and communications.
Showing the newest digital and satellite capabilities, voice communications and even historical Morse code, hams from across the U.S. will be holding public demonstrations of emergency communications abilities.
This Saturday and Sunday, the public will have the opportunity to meet and talk with these ham radio operators and see for themselves what the amateur radio Service is about.
The New River Valley Amateur Radio Club and the Pulaski/Montgomery County Amateur Radio Emergency Service team will be demonstrating their emergency communications abilities from 9 a.m. Saturday through noon Sunday at the Loving Field Ballpark Complex, located off Alum Spring and Robinson Tract roads.
This annual event, called “Field Day,” is the climax of the week long “Amateur Radio Week” sponsored by the ARRL, the National Association for Amateur Radio.
Using only emergency power, ham operators will construct emergency stations in both public and remote sites, such as schools, camp sites, etc., around the country.
Their slogan, “Ham radio works when other systems, don’t!,” is more than just words to them when they prove they can send and receive numerous types of information in many forms without the use of phone systems, internet or any other private, public or governmental infrastructure which can be compromised in a crisis, according to a press release from the NRV Amateur Radio Club.
Trained amateur radio operators can quickly create efficient communications networks to assist various government and non-governmental agencies during times of emergency/disasters in which normal communication systems are overwhelmed or become inoperable due to usage overload, power failure or physical destruction.
More than 34,000 amateur radio operators across the U.S. participated in last year’s event.
The New River Valley Amateur Radio Club and the Pulaski/Montgomery County Amateur Radio Emergency Services team encourages people to come and see for themselves, the tremendous communication capacity that is used on many occasions, to protect and preserve lives and property.
Many lives have been saved in the past months by the usage of communication networks created by ham radio operators, especially when public communication systems failed or were overloaded, the news release states.
There are 650,000 amateur radio operators in the U.S. and more than 2.5 million around the world.

Through the ARRL, ham volunteers provide emergency communications for the DHS Citizen’s Corps, the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, FEMA and thousands of state and local agencies, all free of charge.
To learn more about amateur radio, contact Roger R. Bell II at 674-1200, or go to www.emergency-radio.org.

The public is invited to attend the event this weekend and to meet and talk with the hams.

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Ham radio operators will have field day

DUBLIN — Thousands of ham radio operators will be demonstrating their emergency capabilities on Saturday, June 28, through noon, Sunday, June 29.
During the past year, the news has been full of reports of ham radio operators providing critical communications in emergencies world-wide.
During the current flooding in the Midwest and with Hurricane Katrina, amateur radio, often call “ham radio, “ has frequently been the only way people could communicate, and hundreds of volunteer “hams” traveled to these locations to help in saving lives and property.
When trouble is brewing, ham radio operators are often the first to provide critical information and communications.
Showing the newest digital and satellite capabilities, voice communications and even historical Morse code, hams from across the U.S. will be holding public demonstrations of emergency communications abilities.
This Saturday and Sunday, the public will have the opportunity to meet and talk with these ham radio operators and see for themselves what the amateur radio Service is about.
The New River Valley Amateur Radio Club and the Pulaski/Montgomery County Amateur Radio Emergency Service team will be demonstrating their emergency communications abilities from 9 a.m. Saturday through noon Sunday at the Loving Field Ballpark Complex, located off Alum Spring and Robinson Tract roads.
This annual event, called “Field Day,” is the climax of the week long “Amateur Radio Week” sponsored by the ARRL, the National Association for Amateur Radio.
Using only emergency power, ham operators will construct emergency stations in both public and remote sites, such as schools, camp sites, etc., around the country.
Their slogan, “Ham radio works when other systems, don’t!,” is more than just words to them when they prove they can send and receive numerous types of information in many forms without the use of phone systems, internet or any other private, public or governmental infrastructure which can be compromised in a crisis, according to a press release from the NRV Amateur Radio Club.
Trained amateur radio operators can quickly create efficient communications networks to assist various government and non-governmental agencies during times of emergency/disasters in which normal communication systems are overwhelmed or become inoperable due to usage overload, power failure or physical destruction.
More than 34,000 amateur radio operators across the U.S. participated in last year’s event.
The New River Valley Amateur Radio Club and the Pulaski/Montgomery County Amateur Radio Emergency Services team encourages people to come and see for themselves, the tremendous communication capacity that is used on many occasions, to protect and preserve lives and property.
Many lives have been saved in the past months by the usage of communication networks created by ham radio operators, especially when public communication systems failed or were overloaded, the news release states.
There are 650,000 amateur radio operators in the U.S. and more than 2.5 million around the world.

Through the ARRL, ham volunteers provide emergency communications for the DHS Citizen’s Corps, the American Red Cross, Salvation Army, FEMA and thousands of state and local agencies, all free of charge.
To learn more about amateur radio, contact Roger R. Bell II at 674-1200, or go to www.emergency-radio.org.

The public is invited to attend the event this weekend and to meet and talk with the hams.

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