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Graduation held for Class of 2008

DUBLIN — “Your success in life is never going to be measurable by a bank account, nor by your social standing, but by your impact on the lives of others,” Pulaski County High School senior Lydia Mae Blevins told her fellow classmates Friday night.
Blevins was one of two student speakers chosen to address the Class of 2008 at PCHS’s 34th Commencement held in Dobson Stadium.
A total of 337 students received their diplomas during the ceremony. PCHS Principal Rod Reedy pointed out that 34 percent of the graduates plan to attend four-year colleges or universities, 32 percent will attend community or junior colleges, 10 percent are entering military service, and 24 percent will be joining the workforce.
Regardless what avenue they take, Blevins reminded her fellow classmates to be “true to your words.
“A reputation of integrity will get you further in this world than any level of education,” she said. “Because intelligence is not only knowing facts about life, but more importantly how to live. Live it correctly, and you’ll inadvertently live it more fully.”
Blevins is co-president of the Class of 2008 along with Cameron Wade Lephew.
Blevins, voted Most Valuable Cougar (MVC) by her classmates and the faculty, will attend the College of William and Mary this fall, majoring in linguistics.
She challenged each of the graduates to “not be afraid to make a difference.” She also pointed out that success is measured by more than wealth or fame.
“I’d like to take this opportunity to clarify the definition of success. Webster’s Dictionary defines it as ‘the attainment of wealth or fame; a favorable outcome,’ ” but Blevins said, she find’s Ralph Waldo Emerson’s description to be “far more accurate:”
“To laugh often and much;
To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children;
To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends;
To appreciate beauty, to find the best in others;
To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;
To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived.
This is to have succeeded.”
She reminded her classmates that they will face a world in which “people back-stab, cheat, lie and steal every day as they try to make their marks on the world — and they’ll often call themselves friends while they do it.” Nevertheless, she urged them to forgive, regardless how hard it may be or how much they may struggle in the process.
“Prove to the world that success in Pulaski County doesn’t end on the football field. Show that there is character in each of its graduates.”
She asked them to try to find the positive in everyone even when it is difficult and to always let the best parts of themselves be seen.
“Each of you has something spectacular to offer…share it, graduate, start your life or at least the next phase of it. Dream big, impact others, change the world,” she concluded.
The other student speaker, Molly Thompson Harp, recalled their journey through school from kindergarten to the present in their quest to be successful.
“I can proudly say that each of us here did in fact succeed, and we now stand before you the graduating Class of 2008,” she said.
But she asked her classmates if they will continue to strive for success or “choose the path of least resistance.”
She noted they each have the choice to seize the moment and seize opportunity.
“It is up to us to make a difference.”
Harp will attend University of Virginia this fall and plans to pursue a career in education.
Pulaski County Schools Superintendent Dr. Donald E. Stowers told the seniors “learning is forever and must never stop.” He also stressed the importance of being able to work with others in today’s world.
He continued, “Showing responsibility, acting responsibly and producing are paramount to your success. Regardless of how bright or talented we are, we will never succeed if we cannot forge relationships with others.”
He asked the students to “create the highest vision you can…because you will become what you believe about your vision. Be grateful for what you have regardless of what it is. Find your talent. Find your gift, and be grateful for it.”

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Graduation held for Class of 2008

DUBLIN — “Your success in life is never going to be measurable by a bank account, nor by your social standing, but by your impact on the lives of others,” Pulaski County High School senior Lydia Mae Blevins told her fellow classmates Friday night.
Blevins was one of two student speakers chosen to address the Class of 2008 at PCHS’s 34th Commencement held in Dobson Stadium.
A total of 337 students received their diplomas during the ceremony. PCHS Principal Rod Reedy pointed out that 34 percent of the graduates plan to attend four-year colleges or universities, 32 percent will attend community or junior colleges, 10 percent are entering military service, and 24 percent will be joining the workforce.
Regardless what avenue they take, Blevins reminded her fellow classmates to be “true to your words.
“A reputation of integrity will get you further in this world than any level of education,” she said. “Because intelligence is not only knowing facts about life, but more importantly how to live. Live it correctly, and you’ll inadvertently live it more fully.”
Blevins is co-president of the Class of 2008 along with Cameron Wade Lephew.
Blevins, voted Most Valuable Cougar (MVC) by her classmates and the faculty, will attend the College of William and Mary this fall, majoring in linguistics.
She challenged each of the graduates to “not be afraid to make a difference.” She also pointed out that success is measured by more than wealth or fame.
“I’d like to take this opportunity to clarify the definition of success. Webster’s Dictionary defines it as ‘the attainment of wealth or fame; a favorable outcome,’ ” but Blevins said, she find’s Ralph Waldo Emerson’s description to be “far more accurate:”
“To laugh often and much;
To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children;
To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends;
To appreciate beauty, to find the best in others;
To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;
To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived.
This is to have succeeded.”
She reminded her classmates that they will face a world in which “people back-stab, cheat, lie and steal every day as they try to make their marks on the world — and they’ll often call themselves friends while they do it.” Nevertheless, she urged them to forgive, regardless how hard it may be or how much they may struggle in the process.
“Prove to the world that success in Pulaski County doesn’t end on the football field. Show that there is character in each of its graduates.”
She asked them to try to find the positive in everyone even when it is difficult and to always let the best parts of themselves be seen.
“Each of you has something spectacular to offer…share it, graduate, start your life or at least the next phase of it. Dream big, impact others, change the world,” she concluded.
The other student speaker, Molly Thompson Harp, recalled their journey through school from kindergarten to the present in their quest to be successful.
“I can proudly say that each of us here did in fact succeed, and we now stand before you the graduating Class of 2008,” she said.
But she asked her classmates if they will continue to strive for success or “choose the path of least resistance.”
She noted they each have the choice to seize the moment and seize opportunity.
“It is up to us to make a difference.”
Harp will attend University of Virginia this fall and plans to pursue a career in education.
Pulaski County Schools Superintendent Dr. Donald E. Stowers told the seniors “learning is forever and must never stop.” He also stressed the importance of being able to work with others in today’s world.
He continued, “Showing responsibility, acting responsibly and producing are paramount to your success. Regardless of how bright or talented we are, we will never succeed if we cannot forge relationships with others.”
He asked the students to “create the highest vision you can…because you will become what you believe about your vision. Be grateful for what you have regardless of what it is. Find your talent. Find your gift, and be grateful for it.”

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