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Plant sulfate repairs nearly complete

FAIRLAWN — “We’re very close to wrapping up” repairs from sulfate damage at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, the authority’s executive director said last week.
In an update of costs and progress, Clarke Wallcraft told the Pepper’s Ferry Board of Directors the repair project is just over 76 percent complete. He estimated 90 percent completion in another 35 to 40 days.
The cost to make the necessary repairs has been estimated at $2 million. To date, just over $1.5 million has been spent, according to a report by Wallcraft.
The board voted in December 2006 to assess the town for 84.1 percent of damages caused by excessive sulfates in wastewater treated at the plant. The board attributed the sulfate to industries such as Nanochemonics and the new James Hardie plant.
However, town officials were later able to get the board to reduce the town’s overall payment by about $100,000 by considering depreciation on older pieces of equipment that had to be replaced, such as a 20-year-old force main. The town typically pays 40 percent of the operational costs, which are determined by the amount of flow into the facility.
According to Wallcraft’s report, the Town of Pulaski’s share of the sulfate repair costs, to date, is $987,295.
The board’s decision to include depreciation on some items ended up increasing the other jurisdiction’s repair costs, with the City of Radford seeing the biggest increase – 4.3 percent.
However, Wallcraft suggested at that time the $9,000 to $10,000 in extra costs to other jurisdictions this year be paid out of the facility’s reserves so the board would not have to hold another public hearing on planned rate increases to each jurisdiction.
Councilman and now Mayor Elect Jeff Worrell said the Town of Pulaski is concerned that there is no accurate way to determine the percentage of damage caused by each jurisdiction.
“The whole debate goes back to anyone can jiggle the numbers (and reach different conclusions). No matter what we come up with it’ll be inaccurate. If it’s inaccurate, it’s unfair,” he said.
Town Manager John Hawley equated the board’s efforts to “trying to hit a moving target.”

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Plant sulfate repairs nearly complete

FAIRLAWN — “We’re very close to wrapping up” repairs from sulfate damage at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, the authority’s executive director said last week.
In an update of costs and progress, Clarke Wallcraft told the Pepper’s Ferry Board of Directors the repair project is just over 76 percent complete. He estimated 90 percent completion in another 35 to 40 days.
The cost to make the necessary repairs has been estimated at $2 million. To date, just over $1.5 million has been spent, according to a report by Wallcraft.
The board voted in December 2006 to assess the town for 84.1 percent of damages caused by excessive sulfates in wastewater treated at the plant. The board attributed the sulfate to industries such as Nanochemonics and the new James Hardie plant.
However, town officials were later able to get the board to reduce the town’s overall payment by about $100,000 by considering depreciation on older pieces of equipment that had to be replaced, such as a 20-year-old force main. The town typically pays 40 percent of the operational costs, which are determined by the amount of flow into the facility.
According to Wallcraft’s report, the Town of Pulaski’s share of the sulfate repair costs, to date, is $987,295.
The board’s decision to include depreciation on some items ended up increasing the other jurisdiction’s repair costs, with the City of Radford seeing the biggest increase – 4.3 percent.
However, Wallcraft suggested at that time the $9,000 to $10,000 in extra costs to other jurisdictions this year be paid out of the facility’s reserves so the board would not have to hold another public hearing on planned rate increases to each jurisdiction.
Councilman and now Mayor Elect Jeff Worrell said the Town of Pulaski is concerned that there is no accurate way to determine the percentage of damage caused by each jurisdiction.
“The whole debate goes back to anyone can jiggle the numbers (and reach different conclusions). No matter what we come up with it’ll be inaccurate. If it’s inaccurate, it’s unfair,” he said.
Town Manager John Hawley equated the board’s efforts to “trying to hit a moving target.”

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