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Town asks motorists to share the road

PULASKI — As part of its effort to become more bike friendly, the Town of Pulaski has installed new signs reminding motorists to “Share the Road” with bicyclists.
Craig Quinn, Pulaski’s project engineer, said 15 of the signs are “scattered” throughout the town. He indicated they are primarily displayed in areas where bicyclists are more prevalent.
To determine where the signs should be placed, he said, “we got with a local rider who is in a (bicycling) club, and he helped us design the locations. They’re the ones that ride all the time” and would know the best areas to put the signs.
One such location is at the train station where the bike club starts out on a ride each morning. Other sites are Bob White Boulevard, Lee Highway, East Main Street and at each end of Dora Highway.
According to Virginia law, bicyclists have the same rights and duties as the driver of a vehicle. Bicyclists:
• Must obey all traffic signs, signals, lights and markings.
• Must ride with the flow of traffic on the right side of the road unless making a left turn, overtaking and passing another vehicle, avoiding unsafe conditions or riding on a one-way street.
• Cannot ride between two lanes of traffic moving in the same direction unless there is a separate lane.
• Cannot ride more than two abreast. If riding two abreast, traffic cannot be impeded, and they must move into a single line if being overtaken or passed.
• Cannot ride on interstates or other controlled access highways.
• Must yield the right-of-way to motorists or pedestrians.
• Must signal their intention to stop or turn.
• Are prohibited from wearing earphones in both ears while riding.
In January, a local cycling enthusiast told Pulaski Town Council that becoming a bicycle friendly community would be a good way to boost population and home sales in the area.
After attending a Bicycle Friendly Communities Workshop, David Jencks said communities in other states that have become certified bicycle friendly communities are seeing an increase in people moving into the communities.
He said such communities tend to have twice as many places to shop as communities that are not bicycle friendly.
With the New River Trail Extension, Jencks said Pulaski has a good start toward becoming bicycle friendly.
However, he indicated local motorists do not tend to be well educated on cyclists’ rights on the road.

Town asks motorists to share the road

PULASKI — As part of its effort to become more bike friendly, the Town of Pulaski has installed new signs reminding motorists to “Share the Road” with bicyclists.
Craig Quinn, Pulaski’s project engineer, said 15 of the signs are “scattered” throughout the town. He indicated they are primarily displayed in areas where bicyclists are more prevalent.
To determine where the signs should be placed, he said, “we got with a local rider who is in a (bicycling) club, and he helped us design the locations. They’re the ones that ride all the time” and would know the best areas to put the signs.
One such location is at the train station where the bike club starts out on a ride each morning. Other sites are Bob White Boulevard, Lee Highway, East Main Street and at each end of Dora Highway.
According to Virginia law, bicyclists have the same rights and duties as the driver of a vehicle. Bicyclists:
• Must obey all traffic signs, signals, lights and markings.
• Must ride with the flow of traffic on the right side of the road unless making a left turn, overtaking and passing another vehicle, avoiding unsafe conditions or riding on a one-way street.
• Cannot ride between two lanes of traffic moving in the same direction unless there is a separate lane.
• Cannot ride more than two abreast. If riding two abreast, traffic cannot be impeded, and they must move into a single line if being overtaken or passed.
• Cannot ride on interstates or other controlled access highways.
• Must yield the right-of-way to motorists or pedestrians.
• Must signal their intention to stop or turn.
• Are prohibited from wearing earphones in both ears while riding.
In January, a local cycling enthusiast told Pulaski Town Council that becoming a bicycle friendly community would be a good way to boost population and home sales in the area.
After attending a Bicycle Friendly Communities Workshop, David Jencks said communities in other states that have become certified bicycle friendly communities are seeing an increase in people moving into the communities.
He said such communities tend to have twice as many places to shop as communities that are not bicycle friendly.
With the New River Trail Extension, Jencks said Pulaski has a good start toward becoming bicycle friendly.
However, he indicated local motorists do not tend to be well educated on cyclists’ rights on the road.